Is HR Responsible for Web Security? | Featured Image

Is HR Responsible for Web Security?

Is HR Responsible for Web Security? | Image 1

It is safe to say that cybersecurity should be among a business’s top priorities. While malware like WannaCry spreads around the globe, ruining company after company, small and large businesses alike should be focused on strengthening their digital defenses and building a workplace culture focused on security. Undoubtedly, most HR professionals will wholeheartedly agree with this sentiment – but many won’t lift a finger to address gaps in their employers’ cybersecurity.

There are often concerns over who should build and maintain cybersecurity within a business. On one hand, security software is installed on tech devices, which belong in IT’s wheelhouse. Then again, a security breach affects customer relations, so perhaps the customer service department should ensure every device is protected. However, the truth is that HR should take the bulk of the responsibility for keeping a business safe. Here’s why.

HR Protects the Business and Its People

Through incentivization efforts, behavior-monitoring, policy-setting, management of resources, and more, HR departments work to reinforce the integrity of the business’s foundation: its people. Furthermore, HR provides support for the business, its employees, and ultimately its customers, assisting in the achievement of personal and organizational goals that benefit everyone. Because security should be a primary goal for modern businesses, web security measures should be a top concern for HR departments, too.

When a cyberattack is successful, it isn’t just the faceless company that suffers. Often, employee private information, perhaps including payment data, is leaked as well as business-related financial information. Conversely, a business’s tech assets are hardly imperiled by hackers, who are rarely interested in destroying software or able to impact hardware, so the IT department has little to fear from cyberattack. Because HR serves the business and its employees, who are most threatened by cyber-dangers, HR should work to ensure such data is well-protected by comprehensive web security software.

Is HR Responsible for Web Security? | Image 2

HR Influences Corporate Culture

Yet, effective security software is just one piece of the cyber-protection puzzle. Security experts assert that more often than not, a business’s employees are responsible for data breaches and successful cyberattacks. After all, it is the employees who visit questionable websites, who open shady emails, who click suspicious links, and who fail to install timely updates. Because HR is responsible for employee behavior, HR professionals should actively work against these unhealthy and insecure practices by influencing the culture of the workplace.

HR already has a massive impact on corporate culture. Recruiting efforts can target certain personalities, which form the foundation of a workplace culture. Additionally, HR designs policies and guidelines which shape how employees behave. HR departments should use this sway to establish a culture focused on security. Hiring security-minded workers, hosting regular security trainings, and instilling the idea that security is everyone’s job are ways to ensure employees are aware and alert to security.

HR Understands Compliance Rules

There are all sorts of laws and regulations outlining how businesses should behave, and HR should be familiar with all of them to keep the business safe from fines, litigation, and worse. Often, these rules concern payment minimums and structures, mandatory vacation time, and termination means and methods – but increasingly, the government is turning its attention to online behavior. Already, seven major industries have compliance obligations for digital data. Because HR professionals are already well-versed in adhering to compliance rules, it is hardly a stretch for them to understand burgeoning security regulations. Instead of trying to manage compliance and action in different departments, businesses can streamline the process by giving HR total control over web security efforts.

HR Relies on Technology

These days, every aspect of a business relies on technology – including the HR department. HR professionals use all sorts of digital tools to manage their workforces, from payroll platforms to internal messaging services to online recruitment processes. Should a business’s network be compromised by cyberattack, HR will be as unable to complete their tasks as any other department. If for no other reason than this, HR should be concerned about internet security.

Security failures are bad for business, but they are particularly bad for HR. Because HR departments’ goals align with those of security efforts – and because HR professionals are already well-equipped to handle the intricacies of cybersecurity – HR should be responsible for a business’s web security.

About the Author:

Tiffany Rowe

Tiffany Rowe is a leader in marketing authority, she assists Seek Visibility and our clients in contributing resourceful content throughout the web. Tiffany prides herself in her ability to create and provide high quality content that audiences find valuable. She also enjoys connecting with other bloggers and collaborating for exclusive content in various niches. With many years of experience, Tiffany has found herself more passionate than ever to continue developing content and relationship across multiple platforms and audiences.


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Quality Over Quantity: It’s Time to Hire Better | Featured Image

Quality Over Quantity: It’s Time to Hire Better

Quality Over Quantity: It’s Time to Hire Better | Main Image

These days, there is rarely a technology that can’t be mimicked, a service that can’t be purchased, or a system that isn’t for rent. Big organizations mostly use essentially the same services from Microsoft Office to ATS databases. With so much homogeny, what separates successful companies from the rest? The people are the secret sauce. Even with proprietary software or patent-protected techniques, no company can truly thrive without one extremely important element: effective and creative teams.

Despite all our technological advancements, it’s humans who truly make the difference at an organization. In our 21s t century reality – where technology is ubiquitous – talent acquisition professionals become one of the most important departments at a company, because they are responsible for the most important competitive asset: new hires.

Unfortunately, we don’t always realize how important our talent acquisition processes are. In fact, many companies remain focused on the wrong metrics, concentrating on hiring quickly, rather than zeroing in on finding the right candidate.

Some organizations are already making the shift. Where most recruiters are encouraged to fill roles as quickly as possible, forward-thinking organizations are focused on quality, tasking their recruiters to fill the roles with the best possible candidate.

What caused this shift? That’s easy – organizations are realizing that emphasizing speed in hiring sacrifices quality. And filling a role quickly with the wrong person is extremely costly to an organization.

For the organizations not yet making the shift and slower to realize they are doing it wrong, it’s not all bad news. The fact is, best practices around making hiring decisions have been understood by academics for years. And they are not that difficult to implement. There are new and exciting talent-acquisition tools that are enabling companies to reform their practices and overhaul processes to create something much better.

With artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, technology can play an important role from the get go . For example, it can help someone write a better job description. This first step in the hiring process would then invite a diverse pool of candidates with capabilities that match companies’ needs. Cloud and mobile computing solutions facilitate better communication between recruiters and hiring managers. Nudge technology and access to data allows decision-makers to move away from hiring based purely on gut-decisions and shift to data-driven choices.

Research has identified five hiring best practices that span the talent acquisition process – from writing targeted job descriptions that invite the best candidates to blind resume reviews to conducting structured interviews. These best practices make hiring more effective and yield stronger teams, happier employees, and improve the candidate experience, which reflects on the company at every step. The talent acquisition industry has technology that can facilitate all of these strategies and transform hiring systems to be both more effective and more equitable. What we need now is a change of mindset.

As an industry, let’s forget the incomplete idea that talent acquisition is only about filling an open position. It’s about strategically finding creative and effective team members that fit the company culture and will drive the business forward. As new markets emerge, and old sectors are rapidly transformed, it’s the employees, the human element, who contribute to a company’s success and it’s competitive differentiation.

Instead of pressuring talent acquisition professionals to be faster, or to collect more resumes, true improvement will come from creating processes that prioritize hiring best practices and finding the right hire. This change in focus from the fast hire to the right hire will succeed only if it is organization-wide and reinforced at every level, from senior leadership team and executive suite to the hiring manager and recruiters.

The data is there: the hiring process is broken. We have the tools and the strategies to change. It’s time to start changing our priorities and focusing on the metrics that really matter. It’s time to hire better.

About the Author:

Laura Mather, Founder and CEO, Talent Sonar

Laura Mather, CEO and Founder of Talent Sonar, is an expert on hiring, AI, and the future of work. Her innovative technology, Talent Sonar, is the only comprehensive hiring platform to improve hiring at every step from incorporating values into the hiring process to conducting blind resume review and structured interviewing. She was honored as one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business and as one of Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Entrepreneurs. She is a featured speaker at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Next Generation Summit, HR West, and Ad Week, among others.


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DevScore Introduces Developer Acquisition Functionality

Candidate_Notes

Finding the right software developer just got a lot easier for HRs, recruiters, & hiring managers.

DevScore’s new Acquisition functionality enables HR staff to easily source and vet talented developers that are actively looking for work.

Recruiters can now literally source, vet, & interview developers in minutes.

3 August 2017 — DevScore, the software developer skills-assessment SaaS (Software-as-a-Service) that launched earlier this year at HR Tech World, has introduced a brand new Acquisition feature — one that complements and works seamlessly with its existing functionality — bringing recruiters, hiring managers, and HR a complete candidate-matching, acquisition, assessing, and digital screening service.

Customers can now make targeted developer searches based on actual coding experience; an industry first — a feature that just didn’t exist before in HR tech. They can also filter results by skills, experience, and geographical location easily; allowing them to cherry pick the exact software development talent they need for their business’ individual requirements.

Sourcing_Results

DevScore’s unique and rapidly growing database contains millions of developers. The new Acquisition function finds and connects with those that are actively looking for work.

“In the fast-paced world of software development, acquisition, assessing, and hiring great people quickly is business-critical,” explains DevScore founder, Peter Cummings. “With the new Acquisition feature, recruiters can now literally go from initial sourcing to potentially interviewing a candidate in minutes.”

The Acquisition function is a direct challenge to job boards and candidate sourcing companies that lack the depth of understanding needed to make fully-informed hiring recommendations. These platforms largely use simplistic text-based matching software and lack any sort of advanced assessment and selection criteria. However, up until now coding analysis just hasn’t been available to recruiters.

Candidate_Profile

“There are loads of sites where you can hire recruiters and freelancers,” says Cummings. “But it’s important that you can qualify how good a developer is. There’s always a chance some will exaggerate their CVs, but without any form of code analysis, recruiters can’t get an accurate picture of what a developer can and can’t do. DevScore can literally see what the coder has created and assesses the quality of their code; which enables us to understand how they stack up among their peers.”

Within the Acquisition tool, users can create a customise specific search; filtering developer information by numerous criteria — including experience, flexibility, skills, and location. In addition, searches can be saved and lists can be easily downloaded by users. And where no exact data immediately exists for a chosen set of criteria, customers can create a notification that will let them know when there’s a specific match. Also, API integration makes it easy to pull in DevScore functionality to any job board or talent acquisition tool.

“Everyone who wants to be a developer, can be,” says Cummings. “It’s unlike most other jobs. Your contributions and experience are highly visible. The Acquisition module can help determine which who’s an expert and who’s a novice — reducing the time-to-hire and increasing the quality-of-hire.”

About DevScore:

DevScore enables recruiters and HR staff – even the non-tech savvy – to accurately assess and validate a developer’s skills and experience in an easy understandable format. No need to scan every resume anymore – now you can compile a shortlist with the right candidates in record time.

We scan code repositories across the internet, and analyse the code that developers have submitted. Using our analytics engine we are able to find out how many months the developer has actually used a language, framework, or a development style for. We then assign the developer a score – the DevScore – and from that provide a rank for the developer both worldwide and in the country where they live.

4 BYOD Risks HR Managers Should Know About

4 BYOD Risks HR Managers Should Know About

4 BYOD Risks HR Managers Should Know About

In today’s employment atmosphere, a growing number of companies are shifting toward a more flexible workplace. By implementing bring your own device (BYOD) policies employees are now increasingly using their own devices for business purposes.

Even though such policies can bring numerous benefits to companies, they come with some inherent risks. The following four issues are worth examining before deciding on a BYOD policy.

Irregular Updates

Every mobile device is vulnerable to hacks from outside sources. Your smartphone, tablet and laptop all have similar software that can be hacked if firewalls and other security features aren’t in place or aren’t updated regularly.

Busy employees often put off their security updates. Unfortunately, their phones are then automatically open to potential attacks. In a regular IT environment, it’s up to the business’s IT department to secure every device used for company purposes. Since the devices are the employees’ private property, they are responsible of keeping them updated with the latest versions of security software.

Viruses and Malware

Viruses and malware have numerous pathways that they can take to infect an employee’s device. The worst thing is that an employee’s device could be hacked without them even being aware of the situation.

For example, your employees can receive phishing email with a malicious link that could install viruses or malware when clicked on. The infection could then spread onto the company’s server and compromise corporate information in a matter of seconds.

The phishing email could also look as if it’s from a familiar contact or even a legitimate website. It could ask your employees to click on a link and in order to log in into their account. The employees would then enter their user names and passwords on fake websites giving hackers access to their sensitive information. Identity theft is always a possibility in these hacking situations.

Unsecured Connections

Your employees might use their devices to connect to public Wi-Fi to access necessary data on your company’s server or to go online for personal needs. Unfortunately, using public networks is dangerous since they allow multiple people to connect to the same network, and that includes hackers.

Hackers could intercept the data your employees download or upload, they could install malware on your staff’s devices and even gain access to their email. This is another way malware could spread from the infected devices onto the company’s server and compromise the safety of corporate data.

Your employees need to be aware of these threats and take the appropriate preventive measures. Instruct your employees to turn off Wi-Fi when they don’t need it and disable it from automatically connecting to open networks.

You can also set up a virtual private network (VPN) which will allow your employees to connect to a hotspot without worrying about data breaches. Connecting to a VPN encrypts and secures any data being sent or received. This disables hackers from intercepting sensitive information and compromising the security of your employees’ devices.

Missing Devices

The best opportunity for stealing corporate data is when a device gets into the wrong hands. Lost or stolen devices are always a big security issue, which can lead to leaked proprietary data and vulnerable business positions.

IT professionals need a plan in cases this happens. A remote wipe policy is a very good solution which allows the IT team to completely remove all data on a device after it’s been reported missing.

Since BYOD devices include an employee’s personal data, you need to make sure that the employee agrees to a remote wipe of every piece of data even before they are hired.

Employees should see this step as both a protective corporate and identity-theft policy. To avoid any further information hacks, employees can also make it more difficult to access the data in the first place. A fingerprint or PIN passcode frustrates thieves, and they might toss the device before trying to access the information.

Final Thoughts

These security issues aren’t a reason to forgo a BYOD policy. However, appropriate security measures are necessary in order for it to be successful. Begin your BYOD strategy by educating your employees about the importance of regular updates and how to recognize security threats.

They need to understand that every piece of data is priceless to the business and their personal life. In reality, many people don’t realize how valuable their data is to hackers outside of the corporate atmosphere.

Employees also need to agree to corporate statements, liabilities and compliance measures in order to make this BYOD program a success. At the very least, add professional indemnity insurance coverage to the company so that any data leaks are quickly resolved.

Finally, by protecting the data with software and passwords, businesses can keep their proprietary information private. In the end, the employee’s device can be as safe as any company-issued electronic.

About the Author:

Josh McAllister

Josh McAllister is a freelance technology journalist with years of experience in the IT sector, and independent business consultant. He is passionate about helping small business owners understand how technology can save them time and money. 

Josh is a contributor of a number of digital outlets, and well published including DZoneIoT World News, and Rabid Office Monkey.


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Moving Towards People Analytics Is Now Critical For HR | Featured Image

Moving Towards People Analytics Is Now Critical For HR

Moving Towards People Analytics Is Now Critical For HR | Main Image

HR as a whole has resisted a move towards people analytics for some time but the need is becoming critical.

Recent developments have provided employers with urgent reminders of just why:

  • One third of working life (or 80 working days per year) is spent on completing ‘administrative or repetitive tasks’ according to a new report, costing the UK service industry alone over £400 bn. For HR, not only is it unproductive time but it also diverts attention away from focusing on sourcing talent and employee engagement.
  • That’s not all. The Open University’s (OU) Business Barometer found that the skills gap is now costing the UK an estimated £2.2 billion per year. Delays and skills shortages are driving up recruitment costs as business are forced to pay more to attract the talent they need or turn to temporary workers and recruitment agencies.
  • The problem is compounded by the rise in failed hiring decisions identified by the Recruitment and Employment Confederation.

Moving towards people analytics is vital to help HR to address those issues and adopt a much needed a long-term approach to talent acquisition and retention. Deloitte’s 2017 Human Capital Trends Survey notes that people analytics is undergoing a ‘seismic shift’ and is now going mainstream but employers risk being left behind.

Effective people analytics enables HR access to ‘real-time analytics at the point of need in the business process’ according to Deloitte. In its most basic form, it enables HR to access live data through recruitment software to begin to build a picture of what exactly is shaping the success or otherwise of your hiring process.

The principles behind effective people analytics

For HR, it is essential that decisions related to talent acquisition and employee development are based on data. Hiring teams which are able to understand the benefits of this analysis and the way in which it ultimately impacts business performance and influence future hiring needs will be more successful in attracting talent. This is achievable with people analytics.

Understanding where to begin

Ask questions : Moving towards people analytics begins with the questions asked of your hiring process. For example, less than a quarter of UK business are confident in measuring their quality of hire. Asking questions about the retention levels of recent hires is the first step towards understanding that.

Know your key metrics : Knowing and understanding your metrics drives successful recruitment. Time to hire, the source of your most successful hires and the ratio of accepted versus rejected job offers are all examples of information provided by your recruitment software. Companies relying on manual recruitment or outdated HR technology will be hindered in measuring these metrics accurately.

Analyse the data : Understanding the underlying issues indicated by recruitment data enables HR to adjust hiring processes. For example high levels of candidate drop off rates may indicate a prolonged or repetitive application process. It may also indicate a lack of engagement with the talent in your pipeline. Time to hire is another crucial metric. The OU’s report found filling open jobs is problematic for three quarters of all employers – on average, it is taking one month and 24 days longer than expected. These are issues which can be identified and streamlined with effective HR technology.

The step towards evidence based HR

Simply put, evidence based HR means that hiring decisions are made with reference to supporting data, yet for too many organisations this is not the case. One in five hiring managers make snap decisions on candidates within one minute, according to research from TotalJobs.  Only one third wait until after the interview has ended. Data from your recruitment software should reinforce or challenge your final decision. The potential for human error and bias are also minimised through the use of data driven recruitment.

Once the obstacles to successful hiring are identified, HR can begin to address them and adopt a long-term approach to planning. People analytics can then help to predict the most likely source of your next new hire based on your data. Without this knowledge, it is impossible to improve your hiring process.

Getting started

Recruitment software is the most straightforward way for your business to move towards people analytics. It immediately reduces the time spent on time consuming ‘administrative or repetitive tasks’, streamlines the hiring process to minimise delays and reduces the potential for failed hiring decisions. Making that move is now critical for HR.

Advorto’s recruitment software provides workflow and structure across the entire hiring process, offering a dynamic database of candidates and analytics. Used by some of the world’s leading organisations, it provides a straightforward first step into people analytics and big data. Contact us today to take that first step.


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5 Ways HR Can Harness the Power of SMS

5 Ways HR Can Harness the Power of SMS

Today’s Human Resources departments have been irreversibly transformed by technology and the evolution of a global economy. These changes have brought about many key challenges facing modern HR departments, including management changes, organizational effectiveness, and development. The key to facing these challenges effectively is improving communications. Strong communication processes allow an HR department to manage change on the fly, know who to train and what to train them on, and improve the organization’s overall effectiveness.

Here are five ways you can use SMS to communicate better and solve some of the key challenges plaguing the department:

  1. Scheduling

Managing schedules is difficult, especially when they’re constantly changing. Using SMS is a great way to send out employee schedules quickly. You can send out notices if a particular shift needs to be filled, or if there’s an overtime request. Employees can even use short codes to request their schedule for a specific pay period or request a day off.

  1. Sending Meeting Reminders

If you’re trying to schedule annual benefits review meetings, performance reviews, or any other meetings with an individual or a group of employees, SMS reminders will ensure that they don’t slip through the cracks. A canceled or delayed meeting wastes time for both HR and the employees and delays the transfer of valuable information. A quick reminder helps keeps meetings run on-time with minimal additional costs, making it a simple way to improve efficiency.

  1. Forwarding Critical Messages

It’s important to have a plan for communicating messages that are time-sensitive. For example, if your office is closing for the day due to inclement weather, people need to know not to try braving the roads to come into the office. Perhaps there’s a memo that demands the attention of all employees or an all hands-on deck meeting announcement. No matter what the specifics are, you need a way to reliably reach out to everybody quickly.

With an open rate of 97%, SMS text messaging is a great option for your emergency communication process. Even more importantly, over 90% of SMS text messages are opened within three minutes or less. When you have a message that absolutely needs to get to everybody quickly, SMS can’t be beaten.

  1. Gathering Feedback

Gathering employee feedback is important for a couple of key reasons. First, you’ll have the chance to address employee concerns and increase retention. Just as importantly, you’ll be able to use employee and management feedback to determine skill and learning gaps in your organization. This information should be used to identify areas for an individual, departmental, and company-wide training.

Text messaging is the perfect platform to send out these surveys. They’re simple to put together and can be sent instantly. Employees can respond with quickly and multiple-choice questions can be tabulated on the fly.

  1. Motivating and Engaging

The happier your employees are, the harder they’ll work for you. If you have good company news to share, send it out in a mass text message. Throughout each week or month, send one or two quick motivational messages. You’ll be able to keep everybody informed and motivated without any hassle.

Creating employee schedules, gathering feedback, and motivating the workforce are some of your most important tasks. By following the advice laid out above, you can use SMS to make your job easier and help your department communicate with employees more effectively. In the end, this helps you improve the entire organization, from top to bottom.

For more information on how integrating an SMS software can boost HR communications, click here!


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Leveraging the Best of AI for Outstanding Hiring Results

Leveraging the Best of AI for Outstanding Hiring Results

Written by Laura Mather, Founder and CEO at Unitive, Inc. (Talent Sonar).

Laura Mather, Founder and CEO at Unitive, Inc. (Talent Sonar)

Every hiring team is asking the same question: is this candidate the right person for the job? This should be a fairly simple question to answer, but after the resume review and the interview are over, it’s become pretty clear that humans don’t always have the best intuition. Although we sometimes do get it right, sometimes just isn’t enough. Bad hires are hugely expensive for any organization of any size. Tony Hsieh, the CEO Zappos has estimated that bad hires cost the company “well over $1 million.” The US Department of Labor has estimated that a bad hire can cost a company at least 30 percent of that employee’s first-year earnings.

While many companies are feeling pressure to scale and expand quickly, no company can afford to absorb these losses, especially when you factor in the time and energy your current employees will expend hiring and training them.

Ineffective hiring techniques hurt your chances of finding great hires in numerous ways. Not only will you miss great applicants, or let qualified candidates get lost in the shuffle, bad hiring techniques can also translate into bad candidate experiences, meaning that you may be losing great candidates to competitors just because your hiring process was tedious or confusing.

LinkedIn Talent Solutions found that a shocking 83 percent of applicants said a negative interview experience changed their opinion about a role or a company they had once thought of positively. Not only can a bad experience influence a candidate but a good experience can have an even stronger reaction: 87 percent of respondents to LinkedIn said that a good interview experience improved their opinion of a company they had previously doubted.

When an unstructured and unreliable hiring process leaves candidates feeling confused, frustrated, or even disappointed, this can damage both our hiring outcomes and your company’s reputation. One study found that 72 percent of candidates who had a poor hiring experience shared that experience publicly on sites like Glassdoor.

So how can you leverage the best in people analytics to create a hiring system that consistently yields great hires while also maintaining a positive candidate experience? The answer lies in the careful calibration of human intuition and machine learning. While our “gut instincts” are often wrong, good HR teams are able to combine those human reactions with great data and software that guide hiring decisions but don’t dictate them.

For companies of any size, in any sector, the key to consistently successful hiring isn’t automation alone: it’s structure throughout the process and alignment at every level of the team from executives to managers and recruiters. Software can help combine these crucial components, ensuring teams are guided by the same principles and priorities so that candidates have uniform, positive experiences. Software can also stitch machine learning and AI tools into every step so they become an intuitive part of the process, instead of a cumbersome addition.

Although AI has mostly been used during resume review, this technology can and should be expanded to rest of the process, guiding how managers draft job descriptions so that they are accurate, communicate the most important aspects of the position, and will appeal to a wide range of candidates, ensuring your applicants represent the full pool of potential talent that can succeed in this role.

AI can also help continually guide HR teams back to the qualities and capacities that matter most to this position. That can mean helping interviewers create questions that are relevant, behavior-based, and consistent with other interviewers so that every candidate has a consistent experience. It can also mean scoring candidates so that HR teams can see, without a doubt, which applicants are qualified and why.

Whether you are a Fortune 100 powerhouse or a nimble and growing startup, whether you are looking for a C-Suite executive or a daring creative, your needs remain the same: find great candidates with proven abilities to succeed and convince them to work for you and not your competitor. While the objectives are clear, the task is herculean. With the structure, support, and guidance of AI hiring technologies, HR professionals are finally fully empowered to create meaningful interviews, build positive relationships with candidates, and make great decisions and find the perfect hire every time.


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How Long Will Tech Talent Hold The HR Upper Hand? | Featured Image

How Long Will Tech Talent Hold The HR Upper Hand?

Written by Peter Cummings, Founder, DevScore.

How Long Will Tech Talent Hold The HR Upper Hand? | Main Image

When it comes to demand for IT talent; developers, coders, and programmers have never had it so good. But do those making these key hires always know what they’re buying? As Peter Cummings, Founder, DevScore, wonders how long recruiters can stay on the backfoot for.

Peter Cummings, DevScore
Peter Cummings is a highly sought after IT Specialist with expert knowledge in three distinct fields; IT Security, Cloud Computing and Development.

Recruiting for niche IT positions continues to be a problem. It’s not that there’s (necessarily) a shortage of talent, but as demand for connected devices and Internet of Things technology starts to gain traction, organisations that have never before hired software developers and programmers now find themselves in desperate need of them. Yesterday.

Great news for us techies, right? Well, kinda. The thing is we need to make sure that what we’re being hired to do, is exactly what the companies hiring us need us to actually do. That might sound odd, but if (like me) you’ve been in the dev game for a good few years, you’ll appreciate the challenge of being led tentatively towards a role that your skills aren’t the best fit for, or being ushered into an organisation where the need initially identified isn’t quite as urgent as first thought.

With the shoe on the other foot for a moment — it’s hard for those tasked with hiring us to keep track of IT demands. Not just because IT has a pretty steep learning curve; but it’s constantly changing. A lot of HRs and recruiters don’t know what they don’t know. They lack the depth of technical knowledge needed to hire the right coder for the job — because they aren’t coders themselves.

Conventional wisdom just doesn’t apply. Illustrating a developer’s breadth of expertise using just a CV doesn’t work, so recruiters resort to other methods, doing their best to assess skills through coding tests and other time consuming tasks. Which can often be a massive waste of time for all.

Where development’s concerned, for HR types, getting the right person in place matters more than in most other hires — mostly because we coders come at a premium and are often fought over tooth and nail by different companies.

So how can we demonstrate our skills and expertise in the right way?

Well, first we need to emphasise our specific skillsets and explain how experience and expertise supercede formal education. A lot of software developers are completely self-taught (myself included) and few have any formal education (and we’re in good company considering the likes of Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg swapped education for entrepreneurship).

The fact is the best person for the job might not be who you’d first expect. This fact requires a bit of a mindset shift from a HR perspective. And while skills are inherently difficult to prove, demonstrating impact is a good alternative to coding tests, in-depth interviews, and awkward discussions.

Overall, it’s crucial that companies hire developers that can hit the ground running — for everyone’s benefit. But getting the right fit for any job means helping HRs and recruiters better understand the value you can bring and guiding them through your specific skills — without dazzling them with technical jargon.

Insight like this will ultimately help recruiters and HR managers minimise hiring errors in an increasingly important and costly area of their businesses.

Plus it’ll make your working life a whole lot easier — so you can concentrate on doing the job you were hired to do, rather than pick your way through Jira tickets and technical documentation until the lead dev gets it together…


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5 HR Tech Trends Shaping Your Business | Featured Image

5 HR Tech Trends Shaping Your Business

5 HR Tech Trends Shaping Your Business | Main Image

Technology continues to drive and disrupt today’s talent management strategies. As we move closer to the halfway point of 2017, we take a look at 5 key HR tech trends shaping your business.

Cybersecurity skills challenges

The widely publicised global data breach that affected the NHS last month highlights the very real risks to all businesses. After the talent shortage, PWC notes that cybersecurity is the second highest ranked concern for CEOs, with three quarters (76%) citing this it as a significant challenge in its annual CEO Survey. A UK government report also found that half of all businesses have experienced at least one data breach or cybersecurity attack in the past year, rising to two thirds of medium and large businesses. Your ability to secure your data is an increasing issue and the pressure is on HR to source talent with vital cybersecurity skills. A report from Experis found that demand for cybersecurity professionals is at an all time high, echoing an earlier survey from Robert Half, Technology and Recruitment : The Landscape For 2017 which found that sourcing tech talent with cybersecurity skills was a priority for over half of all hiring managers this year.

The ongoing debate over AI

Predictions of a jobless world have thrown the debate over AI sharply into focus but AI and automation offer a number of benefits for hiring teams. Writing in the Harvard Business Review, Satya Ramaswamy describes ‘machine to machine’ transactions as the ‘low hanging fruit’ of AI rather than ‘people displacement’.

Elsewhere, Gartner predicts that by 2022 smart machines and robots could replace highly trained professionals in sectors including tech, medicine, law and financial services, transforming them into ‘high margin’ industries resembling utilities. But it stresses the benefit that AI brings in replacing repetitive, mundane tasks and offering more meaningful work. The key is to create the right blend of AI and human skills, which HR is ideally positioned for. Gartner suggests that a further benefit of AI is the alleviation of skills shortages in talent starved sectors.

A beneficial and immediate use of AI for HR is the automation of mundane and repetitive tasks in the recruitment cycle through HR technology, allow hiring teams to focus on creating the effective candidate and employee experience that their business urgently needs.

Chatbots in hiring

Today chatbots are emerging as an essential tech tool for high volume recruitment, engaging with candidates via messaging apps with the aim of creating a more interactive and engaging hiring process. The AA was one of the first brands to feature this smart technology and this year it is predicted that chatbot Stanley will interview 2.5 million candidates. As the skills shortage continues, the chatbot offers a more direct and effective way of engaging with sought after millennials or graduate talent. Chatbots are also predicted to make HR’s life easier through simple interactions via mobile devices for both candidates and employees.

Dark data

While still in the exploration stage, dark data can offer vital insights into talent sourcing. Up to 80% of the data created is ‘unstructured’ or ‘dark’ data found in, for example, e-mails, text messages, spreadsheets and pds. At present it is not usable in analytics but AI can be leveraged to organise it into a more usable form. Last month it emerged that Apple have acquired a machine learning based company to strengthen its own capabilities in the area of dark data. Deloitte’s Global Talent Trends report for 2017 reports that only 9% of businesses have a good understanding of the talent dimensions that drive performance. Dark data may help to illuminate those dimensions.

Moving to predictive analytics

It’s not a new or emerging HR tech trend but the transition to predictive analytics is one that HR must eventually (reluctantly?) make as the skills gap in the UK widens and the availability of qualified and digitally able candidates continues to fall. Applying people analytics improves hiring outcomes, reduces the level of early departures from your business and enables HR to begin to predict and plan for future hiring needs. The first step towards predictive analytics is for tech-averse hiring teams to relinquish manual recruitment systems in favour of HR technology and begin to understand the key metrics affecting your hiring process.

Advorto’s recruitment software provides workflow and structure across the entire hiring process, offering a dynamic database of candidates and analytics. Used by some of the world’s leading organisations, it provides a straightforward first step into AI, HR analytics and big data. Start your 30 day free trial today.


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Most popular HR software: How location and business size affects app choices

Most popular HR software: How location and business size affects app choices

Written by Karen McCandless, GetApp.

HR Employee Management

Once upon a time, the HR market was dominated by a few big name players. The likes of ADP, Oracle, or SAP were the main choices available to businesses, large and small. This has all changed, with cloud HR solutions becoming mainstream, and a raft of new entrants shaking up the status quo.

To find out more about exactly what criteria small to medium businesses in different countries are using to select their HR solutions, we turned to data from GetApp users to find out which were the most popular apps.

We found that businesses of 1-50 employees favor cloud-based HR software from startups like themselves, that are new to the market but that promise innovation, and simple pricing plans – often with freemium option.

There is some continuity with businesses of 51-500 employees, with these size of businesses still choosing smaller HR outfits, but ones that have more of a presence in the market, such as Jobvite and Greenhouse.

As businesses grow, it makes sense that they would favor companies that cater towards that end of the market, and that is exactly what we saw with GetApp users of 501-1000 employees. Another interesting trend was this was the first learning management systems featured among the most used apps.

In terms of country HR software usage, British and Canadian users favored apps either based in their own country, or that had a strong presence there.

HR software usage trends

With this in mind, we at GetApp – a startup ourselves with an agile, cloud-based HR system – wanted to find out just whether this would hold true for for our users – whether small businesses in different countries are really choosing these new entrants to the market over the big-name brands.

To test this theory, we used data from the “I Use This” feature on the GetApp website (screenshot below) to find out what is the most popular HR software among our users. (For a detailed methodology on the way that we collected and analyzed this data, see the methodology section at the bottom of the article.)

The approach we took to this was two-pronged: we looked at apps used by different business sizes – varying from solopreneurs to companies of up to 1000 employees – and also at software used in different countries (the U.S., UK, and Canada) to see what insights we could glean.

We grouped together HR apps of all flavors – from talent management, to scheduling, to performance management, and more – to analyze the approach that companies are currently taking towards managing their human resources.

Key Findings:

  • Businesses with 1-50 employees favor newer, more agile HR apps, with lower pricing points
  • Companies with 51 employees and more look for more well-known HR names, combined with innovation
  • Businesses are still adopting point solutions for areas such as recruitment, rather than all-in-one HR apps
  • Adoption of learning management systems is much higher in companies with more than 500 employees
  • Outside of the U.S., companies favor local HR solutions.

Most popular HR software by business size

When splitting HR app usage according to business size, what became apparent was that there is no clear market leader for companies of up-to 1,000 employees. Each size of business had its own preferences, with no runaway leader in any category. This differs from other industries such as accounting, where a few big-name vendors dominate.

There is also no mention of the legacy HR heavyweights that were initially built on premise, such as Oracle, ADP, SuccessFactors (now part of SAP) – or newer cloud-based market leaders such as Workday. Halogen TalentSpace is the only HR app popular among GetApp users to feature in analyst firm Gartner’s Magic Quadrants for HCM or Talent Management, which are focused on the enterprise market. Businesses across the board (up to 1,000 employees) are favoring newer, native cloud software for the HR market.

Where we can see a trend start to emerge is in the type of HR apps used by businesses of less than 50 employees, compared to companies of 51-500, and then again with organizations of 501-1000 employees. We’ll dive into these trends in more depth now.

Businesses of 1-50 employees: startups for startups

When looking at the apps used by businesses of 1-10 employees and 11-50 employees, the most used HR software is consistent, with Zoho Recruit, Breezy HR (formerly Nimble HR), Workable, and Crelate Talent all featuring in the top five for both company sizes.

Delving more deeply to find out why this may be, we noticed that all these HR apps all recent entrants to the market. Breezy HR was founded in 2014, Workable in 2012, Crelate Talent in 2012, and while Zoho as a company was founded in 1996, Zoho Recruit was a more recent addition in November 2009.

All of these apps are natively built for the cloud, cater to small businesses, and market themselves as relatively straightforward and simple software.

Pricing options

Another similarity with the most popular HR software for businesses of 1-10 and 11-50 is pricing. Several solutions offer a free option with limited features, making them useful for startups and small businesses with budget constraints.

In terms of Zoho Recruit pricing, it currently (as of April 2017) offers a free plan for one recruiter with basic ATS functionality, such as scheduling interviews. Even for the most expensive price plan, it’s only $50 per recruiter per month. Zoho can also be seen as a safe pair of hands, with its long company history and large suite of products.

Breezy HR keeps its pricing plans simple, with all of them including unlimited users and candidates. The plans differ according to the number of active jobs. As of April 2017, for one active job, the HR app is free.

While Crelate Talent doesn’t offer free options, its pricing is affordable for small businesses.

Hiring platform Recruitee – one of the most used apps by businesses of 11-50 employees- doesn’t offer a free version, but has competitive pricing options covering the varying needs of different company sizes. It’s still a very new company – set up in mid 2015 – but has already been garnering a lot of positive coverage in publications such as Entreprenuer and Inc.

Workable doesn’t cater solely for this end of the market, but its simple tools, mobile-first approach, and raft of integrations make it an attractive choice for small businesses.

All-in-one HR

Zenefits is the only piece of software on the list (third most popular HR app by businesses of 1-10 employees) that isn’t strictly targeted at simplifying recruiting or talent management. While it originally focused on benefits management, it has since expanded to cover onboarding and employee scheduling. Despite experiencing several scandals and setbacks in 2016, Zenefits emerged as the most well-funded HR tech company in 2016.

Key takeaway: Businesses with less than 50 employees broadly go for the same kind of HR apps that are cloud-based, have affordable pricing plans (often with a free version), and are relatively new to the market.

Businesses of 51-500 employees: innovative new entrants

As the business size grows, the trend swings towards HR software that, while more established than the above startups, is still making waves in the industry due to its innovation and high-profile customers. The most popular HR software for this company size also caters for a wider range of business sizes than the favored apps for businesses of 50 and under.

Jobvite and Greenhouse are two applicant tracking and recruitment apps that are popular with companies of between 51 and 1000 employees.

While Greenhouse is a relatively new entrant to the market (founded in 2012), thanks to a raft of positive media coverage and some high profile customers (Airbnb, Evernote, and Pinterest), it has already made a name for itself in the recruitment industry. Part of Greenhouse’s strategy is based around having an open platform that easily integrates with any other tool you might use for recruitment.

Analytics-driven recruiting platform Jobvite has been around longer (since 2006), and is aimed at both small businesses and enterprises. The app also boasts an impressive client roster, including LinkedIn, Spotify, Etsy, and Verifone. Jobvite’s product offering aims to cover everything from sourcing to hiring to onboarding.

The company continues to innovate by partnering and adding new features, such as integrating with Accurate Background services to allow companies to carry out employment background checks, drug testing and verification services from within Jobvite.

Workable is the one constant across businesses all the way up to 500 employees, as it is another app that caters for a wide range of business sizes.

HR suite adoption

One trend that we see solely with businesses between 51 and 200 employees is a higher adoption of all-in-one HR suites, with BambooHR and Namely both ranking in the top five.

This contrasts with the higher adoption of recruitment and talent management suites among smaller businesses, and a focus on learning management systems in businesses of more than 500 employees (more on that later).

Key takeaway: Businesses of 51-500 look for software that caters for a wide range of business sizes, and that may already have well-known clients. They also put more emphasis on all-in-one HR systems.

Businesses of 501-1000 employees: household names

The trend we see as company size increases is to go for software from more established companies that have been on the market for longer. One example of this is Bullhorn, which is favored by companies of 500 employees and over. Bullhorn originally made a CRM for staffing and recruiting firms, before moving into applicant tracking systems.

Further evidence of this is Halogen TalentSpace, which is the fourth most popular app among companies of 201-500 employees. This software, which came to market in 1996, is regularly named as a visionary in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for talent management. Testament to its success, it was acquired by Saba in early 2017.

Another data-driven recruitment app that is popular with larger businesses is JazzHR (fourth most popular among businesses of 501-1000 employees). Formerly known as The Resumator, it positions itself as a scalable recruitment system, suitable for small businesses but also applicable for growing companies.

Emergence of LMS

Learning management system software makes its first appearance in the most used apps among companies of 501-1000. Mindflash and Accord LMS’s appearance on the list at this points suggests that smaller businesses may be slower in their adoption of LMS.

Key takeaway: Businesses of 501 employees and up tend to favor more well-known and established HR software, and they also start recognizing the importance of learning management systems.

Most used HR software by country

Using data from the U.S., UK, and Canada across all businesses from 1-1000 employees, we found that Breezy HR and Zoho Recruit were particularly popular among GetApp users in all three of these countries.

Zoho Recruit was a favorite in both the U.S. and U.K. (even placing just out of the top three in Canada), while Breezy HR was popular among users from both the U.S. and Canada.

America first

Given the wide range of choices for apps headquartered in the U.S., it was interesting to see India-based Zoho Recruit there in addition to U.S.-based Breezy HR and Crelate Talent.

Canada’s choices

Looking at the choices for Canada, Toronto-based hiring solution Fitzii is popular among businesses in this country, suggesting that there is a preference for local software providers in the HR market, or at least those that have a strong presence there.

Further confirming this, Bullhorn is the second most popular HR software in Canada. While it may not be based in Canada, it has a strong presence in the country, through its partnership with Workopolis, which is Canada’s leading career website. It also already provides applicant tracking functionality to many leading firms based there, and has an office in Vancouver.

UK-based software

In the UK, aside from Zoho Recruit, Workable and Calamari leave management software are the most popular HR software in the country. While neither of these companies are British, both were founded in Europe and have a strong presence in London.

Workable was founded in Athens, but opened an office in London shortly after, before expanding to New York, Boston, and now San Francisco.

However, a plethora of British-based HR software companies such as CakeHR, CIPHR, WeThrive, PARIM, and Findmyshift just missed the top three position, further highlighting the preference for local companies in the market.

Key takeaway: In markets outside of the U.S., countries are showing a strong preference for local software to help manage recruiting and HR needs.

Conclusion

Our findings from analyzing data from GetApp users indicated that the original hypothesis was true: that small to medium businesses in the HR space are opting for new entrants to the market over the more-established brand names, and that they are choosing apps built for the cloud.

Our data also indicated that these companies prefer HR apps based in their own country, or that have a very strong presence there.

If, after reading this report, you’d like to invest in a cloud-based HR app for your business size or from your country, we can help. Here are the next steps.

From our list of HR apps, you can filter by country:

You can also filter by business size:

For a full list of the most popular HR software in these categories, or to reuse any of the charts above, please contact karen@getapp.com.

Methodology

To put together this report, we analyzed data from signed in GetApp users that had selected the “I Use This” option for a particular app on the site. We counted the number of individual users that had selected these apps and segmented according to business size and country. The sample size for each segment differed and we used absolute numbers on our graphs to represent the most used. We then looked into the three most used apps per country, and five most used per business size.


Source: Most popular HR software: How location and business size affects app choices (GetApp report)