CEO’s Corner: Charlene Li on Technology and Employee Experience

Charlene Li

In the end of June 2017 CEO’s Corner post put a spotlight on Charlene Li, Principal Analyst at Altimeter (a Prophet Company) and keynote at this year’s HR TechXpo. Li supports leaders to thrive with disruption, primarily focusing on creating business strategies and developing leadership around digital, social, and emerging technologies. An analyst since 1999, and having seen business, society, and the world undergo seismic changes over the last 18 years, she’s driven to create research and thought leadership that helps to bring greater clarity and inspire audacious actions.

The interview is hosted by Greg Mortona corporate strategy and growth development specialist and Chief Executive Officer of the Northern California HR Association.

Q: You talk about the seismic changes that have recently occurred in the workplace. Besides the obvious impacts of technology, virtual work, and social media, what’s a change you are observing that most people are underestimating? 

A: One of the biggest overlooked opportunities is thinking about the employee experience, as opposed to employee engagement. Employee experience is when you look at a situation through the eyes of the employee, and focus on how the day-to-day experience creates a deeper relationship between the organization and employees. This is a significant shift for HR who must shift from managing transactions (recruiting, hiring, evaluations) and risk mitigation (training and compliance) to nurturing relationships. Technologies makes this easier but it’s only when technology fades into the background, and the relationship work comes forward, that the experience becomes a differentiator to the employee.

Q: What is the biggest takeaway you hope readers get from The Engaged Leader?[i]

A: Relationships form the foundation for leadership and I hope that by reading the book, people understand that digital channels must be part of the repertoire of skills leaders use to develop relationships. My hope is that readers are inspired to hit the pause button on their busy day and take a few minutes to reflect on how they need to be better engaged — even if it means simply listening to the people crucial to the achievement of their goals.

Q: We’re getting ready for our 2nd Annual HR TechXpo which last year was quite an exciting event showcasing the intersection of HR and Technology. You have talked to hundreds of providers, so are probably not easily wowed. What are one or two technological features you have seen in HR solutions that have knocked your socks off?

A: I’m excited to see SaaS-based strategy planning and execution tools getting traction in the market from companies like StrategyBlocks and Cascade. The software makes explicit and transparent the strategic plan of the organization, so that everyone across the organization is connected to the strategy. This means it’s clear how what you do every day impacts the long term strategy. It takes the idea of “connected workforce” and gives it a direction and objective, where the purpose of the connection is a strategic objective. This is exciting for HR because it ties together HR functions (workforce management, performance evaluation) and ties it directly to strategy and business outcomes.

You can find Charlene Li on LinkedIn and on Twitter.

You can find Greg Morton on LinkedIn or on Twitter.

[i] Charlene Li. The Engaged Leader: A Strategy for Your Digital Transformation – Wharton Digital Press, 2015

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2nd Annual HR TechXpo will take place on August 25, 2017 in Hilton Union Square, San Francisco.

The HR Tech Weekly® readers get a free registration! Enter promo code hrtechweekly at time of checkout when you register here: http://hrtechxpo.com/register.

Please use #HRTechXpo to share the news about this exciting event showcasing the intersection of HR and Technology.

If you’d like to comment or have further questions for Charlene Li or Greg Morton, you are welcome to leave your reply here or post on social media adding #CEOCorner.


Source: CEO’s Corner: Charlene Li on Technology and Employee Experience

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Quality Over Quantity: It’s Time to Hire Better | Featured Image

Quality Over Quantity: It’s Time to Hire Better

Quality Over Quantity: It’s Time to Hire Better | Main Image

These days, there is rarely a technology that can’t be mimicked, a service that can’t be purchased, or a system that isn’t for rent. Big organizations mostly use essentially the same services from Microsoft Office to ATS databases. With so much homogeny, what separates successful companies from the rest? The people are the secret sauce. Even with proprietary software or patent-protected techniques, no company can truly thrive without one extremely important element: effective and creative teams.

Despite all our technological advancements, it’s humans who truly make the difference at an organization. In our 21s t century reality – where technology is ubiquitous – talent acquisition professionals become one of the most important departments at a company, because they are responsible for the most important competitive asset: new hires.

Unfortunately, we don’t always realize how important our talent acquisition processes are. In fact, many companies remain focused on the wrong metrics, concentrating on hiring quickly, rather than zeroing in on finding the right candidate.

Some organizations are already making the shift. Where most recruiters are encouraged to fill roles as quickly as possible, forward-thinking organizations are focused on quality, tasking their recruiters to fill the roles with the best possible candidate.

What caused this shift? That’s easy – organizations are realizing that emphasizing speed in hiring sacrifices quality. And filling a role quickly with the wrong person is extremely costly to an organization.

For the organizations not yet making the shift and slower to realize they are doing it wrong, it’s not all bad news. The fact is, best practices around making hiring decisions have been understood by academics for years. And they are not that difficult to implement. There are new and exciting talent-acquisition tools that are enabling companies to reform their practices and overhaul processes to create something much better.

With artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, technology can play an important role from the get go . For example, it can help someone write a better job description. This first step in the hiring process would then invite a diverse pool of candidates with capabilities that match companies’ needs. Cloud and mobile computing solutions facilitate better communication between recruiters and hiring managers. Nudge technology and access to data allows decision-makers to move away from hiring based purely on gut-decisions and shift to data-driven choices.

Research has identified five hiring best practices that span the talent acquisition process – from writing targeted job descriptions that invite the best candidates to blind resume reviews to conducting structured interviews. These best practices make hiring more effective and yield stronger teams, happier employees, and improve the candidate experience, which reflects on the company at every step. The talent acquisition industry has technology that can facilitate all of these strategies and transform hiring systems to be both more effective and more equitable. What we need now is a change of mindset.

As an industry, let’s forget the incomplete idea that talent acquisition is only about filling an open position. It’s about strategically finding creative and effective team members that fit the company culture and will drive the business forward. As new markets emerge, and old sectors are rapidly transformed, it’s the employees, the human element, who contribute to a company’s success and it’s competitive differentiation.

Instead of pressuring talent acquisition professionals to be faster, or to collect more resumes, true improvement will come from creating processes that prioritize hiring best practices and finding the right hire. This change in focus from the fast hire to the right hire will succeed only if it is organization-wide and reinforced at every level, from senior leadership team and executive suite to the hiring manager and recruiters.

The data is there: the hiring process is broken. We have the tools and the strategies to change. It’s time to start changing our priorities and focusing on the metrics that really matter. It’s time to hire better.

About the Author:

Laura Mather, Founder and CEO, Talent Sonar

Laura Mather, CEO and Founder of Talent Sonar, is an expert on hiring, AI, and the future of work. Her innovative technology, Talent Sonar, is the only comprehensive hiring platform to improve hiring at every step from incorporating values into the hiring process to conducting blind resume review and structured interviewing. She was honored as one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business and as one of Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Entrepreneurs. She is a featured speaker at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Next Generation Summit, HR West, and Ad Week, among others.


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How to Build a Strong Employer Brand Image

Employer Brand

There are many benefits to having a strong employer brand. It can decrease the cost per hire by 43%, and even decrease the likelihood that new hires will leave their new company within the first six months by 40%.

75% of job seekers say that an employer’s brand is a deciding factor when applying for a job. That’s 3 out of 4 qualified candidates that you could be missing out on because of a poor employer brand.

You could even be affecting your stock prices by up to 36%.

We looked at the impact of a negative employer brand in a recent post, but if you’re just starting out – or are changing direction – how do you build a strong employer brand?

Create a positive candidate experience

Creating a positive experience for candidates, whether they’re successful or not, improves your brand image and makes people more likely to reapply for future roles.

Creating a negative experience for candidates makes your company seem less welcoming to work for and could put off prospective candidates.

The easier and more open you make the application process, the happier candidates are likely to be. They may even advocate for you even if they’re unsuccessful!

If you create a negative experience, you may lose customers, as Virgin Media did in 2014. Thanks to a poor hiring process, they lost 7,500 customers.

More and more candidates and employees are leaving reviews on sites such as Glassdoor. Like it or not, these reviews have a significant impact on your employer brand.

As many as 52% of job applicants research a company on Glassdoor before applying for a role. If they don’t like what they see, that’s 52% of potential candidates you could miss out on.

Positive Candidate Experience

Give your employees more reasons to stay

Richard Branson once said, “Train people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don’t want to.” He went on to say: “If you look after your staff, they’ll look after your customers.”

When employees feel welcome and appreciated, they’re more productive and more likely to stick around.

One of the best ways to foster employee loyalty is to keep employees engaged. Allowing them control over their schedules, automating dull tasks and offering staff training are just some of the ways this can be done.

Offering employees perks such as flexitime, being able to work from home, or even discounted gym memberships all help to make employees feel valued. They will, in turn, be more likely to promote the company’s culture to their social circles.

This organic promotion of the company can yield great dividends. Discovering how well a company looks after their employees may make friends and family members more likely to consume their products but also more interested in working there.

According to StackOverflow 2017 Developer Survey, 27.8% of employed software developers found their current position through a friend, family member or former colleague. Given how expensive and time-consuming it can be to find developers this is a key growth factor.

Dog Loyalty

Be engaged and engaging on social media

Social media is a ubiquitous part of twenty first century life whether we like it or not.

I don’t know about you, but the first time I hear about a company, I search for them on Facebook and Twitter, before even visiting their website. And that’s just to find information about their services not because I want to work there.

According to CareerArc, job applicants use the same tools when researching a prospective employer – 62% of candidates research a company on social media ‘to evaluate an employer’s brand‘.

Not having a social media presence takes away an opportunity to display your business’ culture and identity. For example, you could use your company Twitter account to share your teams’ accomplishments and deal with customer queries.

Being active on social media helps promote a positive company image to both consumers and potential hires. Be friendly, inclusive and helpful – somewhere a twenty-first century candidate will want to work at.

Social Media Employer Brand

Building up your employer brand with Calendar Sync

Creating an engaged and informed candidate experience benefits your company in both the long and short term. It helps to attract and keep the best talent, as well as improving the likelihood that unsuccessful candidates will reapply in the future.

When employees are engaged, they feel valued and are more likely to speak positively about your brand. Whether positive comments are shared online or offline, they help to improve your employer brand and in turn attract the best talent that will help your company grow.


Source: How to build a strong employer brand | The Cronofy Blog

Robots Are Taking Over Human Resources

Robots Are Taking Over Human Resources – NCHRA TechXpo Pushing Technology Envelope for Industry

HireMojo LogoSan Francisco, CA, August 11, 2017HireMojo, Inc., the Hiring Automation Platform (TM), announced the unveiling of it’s latest hiring “robot” at the Northern California Human Resources Association (NCHRA) HR TechXpo on August 25, 2017. With this invitation, the NCHRA event demonstrates leadership at the intersection of Human Resources (HR) and technology.

Beyond simple automation, complete functions are being transformed with Robotic Process Automation (RPA). According to a recent PWC Research Report, robots will replace up to 38% of U.S. jobs by 2030. Until now, HR functions have been largely insulated from this wave of technology. The introduction of HireMojo’s robot, which makes it possible for nearly anyone to find candidates and fill jobs without needing industry specific knowledge or resources, sets the NCHRA August event apart.

“We are delighted to see the NCHRA lead the way for technology innovation among HR leaders across the country.” said John Younger, HireMojo’s CEO. “Advancing the balance between human and machine actually makes the entire hiring process more intimate, scalable and effective. We applaud the NCHRA for their efforts to pull HireMojo and others together. ”

“By bringing together some of the most transformative technologies for the HR industry, our goal is to help attendees learn to incorporate these advances into their departments.” emphasized Greg Morton, CEO of NCHRA. “HireMojo’s process automation is a good example of a technology most thought was not possible in the recruiting and hiring function, yet it’s here and it works.”

About HireMojo:

HireMojo (http://www.hiremojo.com) develops a subscription-based automation software for the recruiting and hiring function. Based on the data from filling tens of thousands of jobs with millions of applicants, it’s Hiring Automation Platform (TM) incorporates a constellation of resources and performs many of the routine activities needed to make hiring predictable, fast and easy.

About NCHRA:

The Northern California HR Association, one of the nation’s largest HR associations, has been advancing organizations through human resources since 1960. Delivering nearly 200 programs annually, the association is dedicated to connecting human resources professionals with practice resources, leading California-specific training, legal and legislative developments, quality service providers, and each other–forming career-long networks and partnerships.

Contact: Laurie Pehar Borsh
lauriepeharborsh@lpbpr.com
800.915.2151 x706


The HR Tech Weekly readers get a free registration to HR TechXpo in SF on August 25th! Enter promo code hrtechweekly at time of checkout when you register here: http://hrtechxpo.com/register

Employee Experience & 3 More Reasons Why the Future Requires HR

Employee Experience & 3 More Reasons Why the Future Requires HR

HR

HR departments are the last thing fast growing companies pay attention to. In the race to become lean hypergrowth machines, many executives in the tech industry see HR simply as a nice to have, if not a symbol of the corporate culture they want to avoid. While it’s become common to start off without an HR department, now we’re seeing fast growing companies reach past the 50 person mark without any formal HR in sight.

With the onslaught of HR tech tools many companies are opting instead to buy solutions that will take care of everything from recruitment & onboarding to payroll and L&D. This is not only a trend affecting startups, bigger companies are now beginning to use HR tools to decentralize many processes placing them into the hands of managers and even the users themselves.

Unfortunately, HR has been relegated to the equivalent of the office hall monitor for way too long. Is this the end of the HR profession? Are we moving towards an age when HR can be completely replaced by tech?

What Tools Can Do:

People want choices. They want to be able to have some sort of control over the processes that affect them and not have to deal with paperwork or waiting. In this fast moving digital age there is an app for everything, including traditional HR functions such as: recruitment, onboarding, payroll, perks and vacation tracking, performance management and L&D. Self-service is becoming a trend, not only in our personal lives but also in the workplace.

Is HR Still Needed?

The answer is, more than ever. The millennial workforce is much more demanding than any other generation. What’s more, they’re much less likely to stick around if their demands aren’t met. A recent article by Gallup demonstrated that millennials are the generation that’s least engaged in the workplace and most likely to switch jobs, with six in ten saying they would be open to new job opportunities. Today with new tech tools that help your competitors recruit, even passive candidates, there’s no time to lose.

This means that employers need to create a more hands on unique experience to keep young talent engaged starting the day they come in the door. This includes curating and integrating tools into customized processes to make them more efficient, employee focused and reflect a company’s unique employer brand. Ultimately, tech tools are facilitators, not solutions. It’s now HR’s job to design a new type of organization that caters to the needs of its employees. Here are four ways the role of HR will change due to the rise of HR tech:

Creating the Employee Experience

Creating the ultimate employee experience has been recognized in Deloitte’s Human Capital Trends Report for the past few years as the key to attracting, retaining and engaging talent. No employee experience program should be the same. To not only attract talent but to attract the right talent, it’s essential to create a unique employer brand. With the rise of websites like Glassdoor, the more time HR spends creating a great experience for current employees, the more likely they’ll become brand ambassadors for the company.

Likewise, your people are different, give them options… but not too many. One of the most important roles Deloitte foresaw in its 2016 report was the need for HR to become a curator for this overly connected generation. With so many options for eLearning tools, communication channels and perks available, sometimes what this generation needs is a guide who can select and whittle down the vast array of distractions and choices presented on a daily basis.

While traditional HR functions may be moving more towards user oriented self-service, it’s HR’s job to choose tools that meet their people’s needs and work best within the organizational framework they’ve designed.

Organizational Architect

Another key aspect of creating the ultimate employee experience is to reinvent and rehabilitate decades old processes that employees distrust or even hate. Performance appraisals are one such process that have often gotten a bad rap. In traditional stack ranking style, they were unabashedly used to decide who would stay and who would be shown the door.

Today many HR departments are starting the process of rehabilitating performance management by getting rid of or reinventing the process to make it more focused on employee growth and development. Cementing the change they’re replacing reviews with employee driven feedback interactions, more frequent coaching conversations and even the opportunity to give upward feedback – a major departure from the so called ‘rank and yank’ system.

Culture

Each company has its own unique culture, whether it reflects what executives envisioned is another question. It’s not necessarily the job of HR to create their company’s culture but to take its values and mission and infuse them throughout all processes within the organization. A company’s core values are often described as its moral compass. As many recent cases show, this should not be taken lightly.

After fast growing tech company Zenefits was charged with taking short cuts on online broker license certifications they came out with a statement announcing that, “Zenefits now is focused on developing business practices that will ensure compliance with all regulatory requirements, and making certain that Zenefits operates with integrity as its No. 1 value.”

However, what must be remembered is that words and reality can be two different things. Your top leadership can profess a company’s values but you need a constant reinforcement of those values at every level of the organization to ensure they’ll really be followed. As the architect behind all people processes, putting HR in charge of strengthening and infusing values (with full support from top leadership) is the best way to ensure they’re fully integrated into your culture.

Translating People Data

Employee experience is not something that can be designed and put in place for life. Just like companies that aren’t constantly innovating their product, those which are not innovating their employee experience will lose out in the talent market. That’s why HR must create an always on engagement culture by frequently measuring and analyzing. People data can tell you when engagement levels are low but it can’t tell you what the root of the problem is. This is where HR must learn to identify the triggers through processes like employee journey mapping and then effectively communicate to executives the changes which need to be made through storytelling.

Conclusion

The great thing about the rise of HR tech is that it takes away more of the administrative tasks HR has had to deal with in the past and leaves professionals with more time to transform their organizations into great places to work. The challenge HR will face is adopting a new way of thinking about their profession and arming themselves with the tools they’ll need to bring their department and company forward in the future. For more info join our free employee experience email course.


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Referrals | The HR Tech Weekly®

What’s Going Wrong with Employee Referrals?..

We’ve been out speaking to HR teams about our new employee referral platform and one thing is abundantly clear — everyone thinks employee referrals are great! The problem is that, despite us all being more interconnected than ever, employee referral hires are, with a few exceptions, very low.

Do your referral hires account for less than 10% of your annual hires? Don’t worry, our research suggests you are firmly amongst the majority. Even if you’re getting more referral hires, unless you are securing 30% of your annual hires through referrals, we don’t think you are fulfilling your employee referral potential.

So, what’s the problem? We went out and spoke to employees across a range of industries to find out…

1. I’m not told about vacancies at my company

It was surprising to hear how many people cited a lack of visibility as a key reason. To be fair to the employees, there’s not much they can do if they’re not told about roles.

2. It takes too long to refer someone

What does that mean? Well, we weren’t sure either so drilled down a bit further.

Basically, a lot of employees said that, if they receive an email about a vacancy, they simply don’t have the time to draft messages and contact their network. They tell themselves they’ll come back to it later but, of course, they rarely do. Another common gripe was “archaic processes” to submit a referral.

3. No recognition unless a referred candidate is hired

There seems to be a feeling that, while it makes sense to only pay recruitment consultants if a candidate is hired, a company’s employees should be treated differently.

Ultimately, they feel that they have put a lot of effort in and recommended a strong candidate, albeit a candidate not hired for that role, and that should be recognised.

4. Companies could offer more interesting incentives

Are you telling me that a big fat referral bonus isn’t enough..? In fairness, it’s not as greedy as first glance suggests. The point made by a few respondents was that not everyone is motivated by money and their company could potentially offer other awards (e.g. a cookery course).

What’s the solution?

It’s pretty simple really. You just need to use our employee referral platform, Real Links.

While that may be a shameless plug, all the employees and companies that we have spoken to agree that Real Links goes a long way to solving the problems mentioned above and will increase employee engagement.

Find out how we can help you too by signing up for a free trial.


Source: What’s going wrong with employee referrals..? – Sam Davies – Medium

DevScore Introduces Developer Acquisition Functionality

Candidate_Notes

Finding the right software developer just got a lot easier for HRs, recruiters, & hiring managers.

DevScore’s new Acquisition functionality enables HR staff to easily source and vet talented developers that are actively looking for work.

Recruiters can now literally source, vet, & interview developers in minutes.

3 August 2017 — DevScore, the software developer skills-assessment SaaS (Software-as-a-Service) that launched earlier this year at HR Tech World, has introduced a brand new Acquisition feature — one that complements and works seamlessly with its existing functionality — bringing recruiters, hiring managers, and HR a complete candidate-matching, acquisition, assessing, and digital screening service.

Customers can now make targeted developer searches based on actual coding experience; an industry first — a feature that just didn’t exist before in HR tech. They can also filter results by skills, experience, and geographical location easily; allowing them to cherry pick the exact software development talent they need for their business’ individual requirements.

Sourcing_Results

DevScore’s unique and rapidly growing database contains millions of developers. The new Acquisition function finds and connects with those that are actively looking for work.

“In the fast-paced world of software development, acquisition, assessing, and hiring great people quickly is business-critical,” explains DevScore founder, Peter Cummings. “With the new Acquisition feature, recruiters can now literally go from initial sourcing to potentially interviewing a candidate in minutes.”

The Acquisition function is a direct challenge to job boards and candidate sourcing companies that lack the depth of understanding needed to make fully-informed hiring recommendations. These platforms largely use simplistic text-based matching software and lack any sort of advanced assessment and selection criteria. However, up until now coding analysis just hasn’t been available to recruiters.

Candidate_Profile

“There are loads of sites where you can hire recruiters and freelancers,” says Cummings. “But it’s important that you can qualify how good a developer is. There’s always a chance some will exaggerate their CVs, but without any form of code analysis, recruiters can’t get an accurate picture of what a developer can and can’t do. DevScore can literally see what the coder has created and assesses the quality of their code; which enables us to understand how they stack up among their peers.”

Within the Acquisition tool, users can create a customise specific search; filtering developer information by numerous criteria — including experience, flexibility, skills, and location. In addition, searches can be saved and lists can be easily downloaded by users. And where no exact data immediately exists for a chosen set of criteria, customers can create a notification that will let them know when there’s a specific match. Also, API integration makes it easy to pull in DevScore functionality to any job board or talent acquisition tool.

“Everyone who wants to be a developer, can be,” says Cummings. “It’s unlike most other jobs. Your contributions and experience are highly visible. The Acquisition module can help determine which who’s an expert and who’s a novice — reducing the time-to-hire and increasing the quality-of-hire.”

About DevScore:

DevScore enables recruiters and HR staff – even the non-tech savvy – to accurately assess and validate a developer’s skills and experience in an easy understandable format. No need to scan every resume anymore – now you can compile a shortlist with the right candidates in record time.

We scan code repositories across the internet, and analyse the code that developers have submitted. Using our analytics engine we are able to find out how many months the developer has actually used a language, framework, or a development style for. We then assign the developer a score – the DevScore – and from that provide a rank for the developer both worldwide and in the country where they live.

The Best Technology To Help Overcome HR Management Problems

The Best Technology To Help Overcome HR Management Problems

In this increasingly digital age, technology is apparent in just about every industry, none more so than Human Resources, or HR. Team and data management is one area that is well serviced by some of that new tech and could help make your HR problems a thing of the past.

Whether you’re an old hand at HR management or a new starter, there’s a whole host of software, hardware and programs designed to help you overcome problems, so you can manage your new project smoothly. Because we’re supporters of all the great tech that’s out there – new and not-so-new – here’s a top 5 of free-to-use team, data and project management tools, perfect for any HR department.

Wrike

While micromanaging can be offputting for a new team of staff, Wrike’s software means your HR team or manager, can see what everyone has done and what they’re working on, all on a single platform. Although you have to pay for the more advanced options that are available, the free version is great starting point and gives you a lot of useful tools. It integrates with third-party programs and, while it’s easy to see what everyone is doing, with regards to any project or regular work, there are handy privacy settings and options, too.

Gantt Project

A flexible and well-appointed app, Gantt Project is a tool that works for HR managers and teams across numerous industries. No aspect of it falls behind a paywall and there are some useful small details – such as the ability to insert milestones or add dependency constraints for moving forward – which can be helpful when creating staff reports and managing development. It can seem a little complex at times, but, there’s a lot of ability here that will help you overcome any previous problems you’ve experienced in monitoring staff anmd keeping on top of thier achievments.

Bitrix 24

If you keep your user count to 12 or under, then this program will remain free, making it the ideal team, data or project management solution for small businesses. This app allows your entire team to communicate easily regardless of their location. And, it comes with free cloud storage too. There are some more useful details in this project management suite of tools, but you might have to pay to access the best of them. It will likely be worth it, though.

Harvest

The world of HR has numerous challenges, no matter which industry you’re working in. That’s why Harvest is a great option for many professionals. It provides an easy-to-use interface that incorporates:

  • Time-tracking.
  • Report creation.
  • Invoicing.
  • Expenses tracking.
  • Is available on mobile, laptop and tablet.

An intuitive tool that makes it easier to keep on top of everything that’s going on, no matter where you are.

Trello

Now, this program has been around since 2011, so is probably familiar to many of you. However, that doesn’t make it any less of a great option for your HR team needs. This piece of tech has grown a lot over the past six years, incorporating multiple add-ins that increase its flexibility and make it useful for multiple industries and specific needs. The interface means it’s easy to see what’s going on at-a-glance, while the real-time updates make sure the whole HR team is always on the same page as the relevant company staff.

Tech Tools for Every HR Management Problem

Only five HR, team, data and project management technology tools have been discussed here, yet there are many more excellent options out there. It’s always helpful, though, to have the benefits of existing options pointed out. Not only does it help you identify what problems you foresee or are experiencing, but you can also see what might not be as relevant to your specific needs.

HR is an important and complex role, so don’t shy away from using some of the great tech that’s been designed to make it that little bit easier for you.

Written by Jackie Edwards, specially for The HR Tech Weekly®

7 Recruitment Metrics Essential For Your Hiring Success

7 Recruitment Metrics Essential For Your Hiring Success

7 Recruitment Metrics Essential For Your Hiring Success

As employers continue to face falling candidate availability and rising demand for staff, understanding your recruitment metrics is vital to attract, source and retain the talent your business needs. Metrics are used to measure and monitor the progress and success of your talent acquisition strategy. Here are 7 you need to know:

Time to hire

For companies new to recruitment metrics, measuring time to hire should be your priority. On average, it takes employers four weeks to fill an open job but talent disappears from the job market within a matter of days. A prolonged time to hire indicates a number of issues including a repetitive application process or poor decision making on final candidate selection. Reduce your time to hire by tagging your referred or priority candidates through your applicant tracking software and offering a registration of interest to capture the contact details of qualified candidates.

Source of hire

Understanding the source of your most successful hires enables HR to focus on those channels to fill future jobs. Candidates enter your recruitment funnel from a variety of sources including your careers website, employee referrals, social media, your own talent pool and job boards. Focus on the sources that provide the most qualified candidates for a better response to your next vacancy. Ideally, employee referrals should provide your top source of quality hires.

Candidate drop-offs

An estimated 90% of candidate drop-offs are a direct result of a poor time to hire. If your HR analytics reveal alarming levels of candidates abandoning your hiring process pay attention to that metric. A prolonged application process and failure to engage with applicants in your pipeline and a negative candidate experience all affect this vital metric.

Quality of hire

Under a quarter of UK employers are confident in measuring their quality of hire. The easiest way to gain insight into your quality of hire is by measuring your attrition rates among your most recent recruits. Incorporating pre-hire assessments, reviewing your screening parameters and carrying out exit interviews with your departing employees will enable HR to gain clarity around this issue. With an estimated two out of every five hires now failing, understanding your quality of hire is essential.

Retention

The problem of retaining new hires is shaping up to be one of the major recruitment trends for 2017. A new report from CV Library found that one in five new hires leaves either during or before the end of their probationary period. If your recruitment data shows a disproportionate level of early departures focus on your interviews first. Unrealistic expectations result in your candidate leaving early but the problem may also lie in your decision making. 75% of decisions are based on the interview alone, leaving your process at risk of unconscious bias and bad hires. Support your decision with the evidence in your recruitment analytics.

Cost of hire

A recent report from the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) found that 85% of hiring managers admit to making a bad hiring decision but one third believe there are no costs relating to this decision. One in five also have no idea how much a bad hire costs their business. The report suggests that, an unsuccessful hire in a position with a salary of £42,000, for example, costs your business over £132,000. Your cost of hire will include job adverts, internal hiring costs, interviews and agency fees. The final cost should also be measured in terms of both the financial impact and the impact on the morale and performance of your existing employees.

Job acceptance ratio/Reneged job offers

Job hoarding candidates became a very real problem for UK employers last year, particularly for graduate recruiters where the number of reneged job offers meant that 1,000 graduate jobs went unfilled. A poor job offer to acceptance ratio will be affected by a number of issues, including an irresistible counter offer, a poor candidate experience, a salary which doesn’t reflect market rates or delays in making a decision on candidate selection. Reneged job offers also suggest a potential problem with onboarding. Your onboarding process should begin as soon as your job offer is accepted to prevent your new employees going AWOL on their first day.

Advorto’s recruitment software provides workflow and structure across the entire hiring process and offering a dynamic database of candidates and analytics. Used by some of the world’s leading organisations, it provides a straightforward first step into people analytics and big data. Contact us today.


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Whatever you do do It with all your heart

How to Improve the Candidate Experience

Whatever you do do it with all your heart

Picture the scene: you’ve just started hiring for a new role and have received more applications than you can answer in a week. There’s hundreds of CVs to read, sort through, and shortlist, then you need to contact everyone and let them know if they’ve been successful. How do you find the time to do everything?

Chances are, you won’t.

Most companies only respond to candidates that have progressed to the next stage of the hiring process. Everyone else stays in the dark. Eventually, they’ll just have to assume they were unsuccessful.

Good communication between companies and candidates is imperative. Even if candidates don’t go on to become an employee, keeping them engaged and informed is crucial to creating a positive experience and building a strong employer brand. If the application process is complicated or opaque, candidates are less likely to apply for future positions and will share their negative experience with their social circles. This may, in turn, negatively affect the company’s brand image, as well as their image as an employer.

According to a study sponsored by ZenDesk, there’s a 95% chance that customers will share a negative experience with their social circle.

Candidate Experience. Chatting.

Many of these candidates could go on to become customers, or may already be customers. A negative experience could put them off your company or product.

In 2014, 18% of Virgin Media job applicants subscribed to their services. However, after experiencing a poor hiring process, 7,500 of those applicants cancelled their subscriptions and went to a competitor. The company lost out on £4.4m in revenue.

A complicated application process, not responding to unsuccessful candidates, and a long-winded hiring process are just some of the things that can lead to a negative candidate experience.

While it’s important to find the right candidate for a job, it’s also worth remembering that candidates are interviewing the company as much as the company is interviewing them.

Candidates want a simple, informed experience because that kind of transparency reflects the company’s culture and the kind of place they could be working in.

If the process is opaque, overcomplicated, or makes them unhappy, they may not accept a job offer even if you think they’re a great fit for the role.

When a company invests in a positive candidate experience, they can
improve the quality of their hires by as much as 70%. When we know how much growth is linked to talent acquisition that’s reason enough to invest in building a strong and engaging employer brand.

However, it can be difficult for busy hiring managers to find time to reply to everyone. When there’s already the responsibility of selecting CVs and organising interviews, it leaves little time to connect with every candidate.

The rise of HR tech

Hiring managers in large companies spend an average of 26 days trying to find each new hire, which means they need to spend their time wisely. The more time they spend trying to find the right person for the job, the more challenges this creates for the team around them—they not only have to fill in for the empty role, but also for the hiring manager. This creates greater pressure on employees and increases their stress levels, which can lead to long-term sick leave or a higher staff turnover.

The progresses in HR tech have already allowed hiring managers to shorten the hiring process: chatbots can be set up to answer candidate queries; AIs can scan CVs and help shortlist candidates, and Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) can help to manage large volumes of applications and candidates.

Candidate Experience

Creating a positive candidate experience

Maintaining a connection with candidates right from the start creates a relationship that can be cultivated even if the candidate is unsuccessful. Those that aren’t a good fit right now might be in a couple of years, or they may be perfect for another department. Should they feel negatively about the application process, they’re less likely to re-apply for the same role or consider a different department.

A negative candidate experience means that companies lose out on talent and may end up helping their competition.

Talent acquisition is often the difference between a growing business and a stalling one.

It’s not just about responding to queries and ensuring that your ATS is mobile-friendly, though.

One of the most time-consuming processes of hiring is finding a time when a candidate and interview panel are free. The more candidates and interviewers there are, the longer this process takes. However, this process can be automated, saving the hiring manager a great deal of time.

Candidate Engagement Time

Save time with automated real-time interview scheduling

In order to streamline the interview scheduling process, ATS providers can add calendar sync to their products in order to build smart scheduling feature that allow users to access the real-time availability of people both inside and outside the organisation.

When an ATS is integrated with a company’s calendar domain, hiring managers don’t need to chase an interview panel to find when they’re available. The hiring manage can email candidates with the real-time availability of the interviewers to find a time that works for everyone. This not only reduces double-bookings but can also help to minimise the number of latecomers or no-shows.

If anyone becomes unavailable, the ATS can be notified and an email can be sent to organise a new time for everyone to meet—there’s no need to rely on long email conversations or more phone calls.

The better the experience a candidate goes through when applying for a job, the more likely they are to speak positively of the company, even if they don’t get the role. This improves the company’s image and helps attract more top talent, and in doing so, allows the company to grow faster.

About the Author:

Kristina Proffitt

Kristina Proffitt is a content marketer at Cronofy, the unified Calendar API. Cronofy helps companies to connect their software to users’ calendars whatever calendar service they use. When she’s not writing about APIs or HR tech, she shares her latest discoveries and the occasional GIF on Twitter.

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Source: How to improve the candidate experience | Cronofy Blog