The Inconvenient Truth of Hidden Conflict in the C-suite – And What to Do About It

Written by Hesham El Komy, Senior Director, International Channels at Epicor Software. Specially for The HR Tech Weekly®.

The Inconvenient Truth of Hidden Conflict in the C-suite

A little bit of conflict between members of the C-suite is inevitable. When each member has different priorities and business objectives to the rest of the C-suite, it’s possible for this conflict to cause problems. Part of the tension is caused by a lack of consensus on business growth. According to recent research by Epicor, this misalignment of goals could lead to business problems if left unchecked. But if differing viewpoints are channelled positively, using technology and data to inform decision-making, suddenly ideas can foster growth and innovation rather than continue to be a source of conflict.

Hesham El Komy, Senior Director, International Channels at Epicor Software
Hesham El Komy, Senior Director, International Channels at Epicor Software

So what else could be contributing to conflict within the C-suite? One theory is that the CEO occupies a lonely position compared to the rest of the C-suite and has very little insight into the inner-workings of the internal departments within the business. CEOs tend to be more concerned with their “outward selves” – answering to stakeholders and explaining numbers to the board of directors.

Rob Morris, managing director and general manager of intellectual property at leadership consultancy firm YSC believes CEOs may feel the burden of growth more than other members of the C-suite. He refers to the CEO operating “like an island, despite the stereotypical image of a CEO projecting confidence and stability”. A recent study in Harvard Business Review examined how the burden of being responsible for tough business decisions can make a difference. It found that “93% of CEOs require more preparation for the role than they typically get” and are typically unready for the “loneliness and accountability that lies ahead”.

A variety of new technology roles could also be aggravating the tension within the C-suite. As a Wall Street Journal article reports, CIOs and CTOs are struggling to “differentiate their responsibilities”. The article goes on to say, “With so many roles, even other C-levels may not know where to turn to address a particular IT-related issue or problem. And the overlaps and conflicts may well lead to infighting”.

But while it is normal to have differing opinions and views – it is when these conflicts turn unhealthy and start becoming a strain on maintaining strong and healthy business operations that it becomes a problem. As Morris says, “conflict in a healthy team climate can lead to more effectiveness, but when the conflict remains hidden, confined to disagreements between only one or two key stakeholders, it can quickly become dysfunctional”.

So how can disagreements be turned into opportunities for innovation? Ideas and opinions can be shut down if they lack enough clear data to back them up. Having access to real-time information and insight can solve this. This means that key business discussions can be based on detailed metrics rather than simple “hunches” or gut-feelings. Senior business executives can then propose new ideas based on facts in front of them changing the conversation from perceived issues and problems to actionable steps designed to promote business growth.

As the Epicor research reveals, it is natural to have different ideas from other members in the senior team. But it is equally important to be aware that the battles should not be based on biased agendas that can only hinder business growth.

Some CEOs have already noted the positive impact the use of data can bring to ease the burden of managing business growth. The research, which questioned over 1,800 business leaders, revealed that 40% of CEOs agreed that access to information is of very significant importance to them, compared to 34% of CFOs, COOs and CIOs on average. Furthermore, 35% of CEOs agreed that having the right technology has made growth possible. Interestingly, one-in-ten blamed a lack of technology in hindering business growth.

“It’s essential to be able to interpret the data you have, and make good strategic judgements based on that data. But alignment of goals and information is key if the use of data is to be effective. Like rowers in a boat, C-suite members need to work together, if they are to make conflict a force for healthy business growth,” says Morris.

Still, whilst there are many benefits to using data to inform decision-making, challenges remain. A report has found that it’s possible for C-suite members to suffer from an “information overload” when the data cannot be used effectively, because there’s just too much of it and they lack the technology to make sense of it all. C-suite members must foster a culture of “collaboration and transparency”; using relevant information to build trust and tackle business challenges together.

The emergence of technology and the differing opinions within the C-suite are bound to crank up the tension amongst executives. But a failure to see the wider repercussions on the business can be disastrous. That does not mean differing opinions must be stunted. A healthy conflict based on data and facts can turn a tense situation into a positive experience for the business.

The journey from conflict to healthy debates must start with the provision of accurate and relevant data. So how do businesses achieve this?

If it’s important that C-level executives are exposed to the same information, in real time, the provision of up-to-date data via intelligent software becomes invaluable. The latest enterprise resource management systems (ERP), for example, can be accessed anywhere. So, whether it’s the CEO at a stakeholder meeting, or a COO discussing plans with teams, it is possible for them to base their business decisions on the same information. Once they are aligned in this way, they can discuss business priorities and concerns more effectively, changing the conversations in the boardroom and positively impacting the whole business.


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Streamlining HR Management Process Using Latest Trends in Technology

Streamlining HR Management Process Using Latest Trends in Technology

Whether you’re aware of it or not, global investment in corporate HR technology is on the rise and according to the most recent Human Resources Transformation Survey Report, the investment is growing at an exponential rate. Almost 90% of respondents said they plan to spend the same amount (some even said more) on HR systems this year. Furthermore, roughly 60% of respondents plan to start using mobile technologies for various HR transactions in the next 12 months.

The report, however, revealed something maybe even more interesting. While most people are satisfied with the technology they use for their performance management, almost 30% of respondents still use paper. Given the number of HR solutions on the market, it is quite surprising that so many companies out there are still depending on paper to perform certain HR tasks. But as the reliance on software increases, the use of paper is bound to decline.

The point here is, as times goes by, more and more companies will start automating and improving their HR processes by using new technology. To keep up with the competition, you should start looking at the latest trends, and use them to the best of your abilities to streamline your HR process.

Increasing Flexibility with the Cloud

The days of being chained to a desk and a PC are fortunately long gone, as a recent Gallup Poll revealed that more than 33% of workers are using their mobile devices to access work after hours. What’s more, around 96% of employees in the United States say that they use at least one of their own mobile devices to access work-related documents. Modern, cloud-based systems allow you to access important corporate files anytime, anywhere, which means that you can review a new employee resume from the airport, or send approvals for salary increases from your home office.

Real-Time Feedback

As the economy grows, employee engagement and retention have become a top priority. However, even as attention shifts towards the contentment of the staff, engagement is still surprisingly low. As a matter of fact, Quantum Workplace reports that employee engagement is at its lowest level in 8 years. So how can you keep up with your employees’ feelings and needs and how can technology help? In response to these concerns, a number of software providers that offer real-time employee feedback tools have popped up in the last couple of months. Performance review tools like Impraise will allow HR departments to more promptly discover, and respond to workers’ problems, needs and suggestions.

Managing Talent with People Analytics

People analytics, a BI-based approach to evaluating and managing talents presents a groundbreaking opportunity for HR. Furthermore, Deloitte’s Human Capital Trends report indicates that people analytics is more important than people originally thought. The report has revealed that 87% of business leaders are worried about retention and engagement, and 85% about the skill of their staff. And while some organizations have been slow at adapting to the new technology, many companies such as Starling Trust Sciences have developed algorithms that can identify “toxic” workers, predict attrition and even highlight the promotions most likely to produce high-performing workers.

Balancing Satisfaction with Scheduling Needs

Keeping the staff satisfied mostly relies on an increased attention to scheduling, and the ability to view schedules instantly, relieving the HR professionals of the pressure to pad staff levels to cover shifts in case of critical situations. Moreover, according to ADP research, scheduling automation can help organization save over 20% on overtime costs. Fortunately, there are plenty automated staff scheduling software that provide visibility across your organization and give insight into scheduling gaps, cost controls and available resources and can help you optimize organizational performance.

The Correlation between Technology and Satisfaction

Did you know that more than 70% of employees who gave their manager high marks also rated their performance management systems as “very good” and “great”? Well, according to Gallup’s analysis of 50,000 employees, it’s absolutely true. And while we cannot say that all good HR managers have good tools, it’s evident that both HR professionals and employees are more likely to be efficient and satisfied at their jobs when they have the right set of tools at their disposal.

About the Author

Nate Vickery, Bizzmark Blog

Nate Vickery is a business consultant mostly interested in latest technology trends applicable to SMB and startup management and marketing. Nate is also the editor at a business oriented blog BizzmarkBlog.com

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Streamlining the Employee Experience with an HCM

Employee-Advocates-e1392214604918.png

Ah, the “employee experience.”

It’s a popular phrase tossed around by growing businesses. As more candidates are needed for steady growth, small and mid-sized business owners feel the strain to keep a firm grip on compliance while ensuring employees receive efficient and thorough transition into roles, up-to-date information and certifications, performance review procedures and follow-ups, job satisfaction, and so, so much more.

When your company is climbing from 20 to 50 to 100 employees, the need for true Human Resources can easily sneak up on you. Before you know it, you’re rushing to find answers to HR problems you hadn’t considered — and why would you? It’s not your area of expertise. And Google only helps so much…

When you add to the mix that millennials have officially overtaken Generation Xers as the largest generation in the U.S. labor force, organizations are scrambling to find, nurture, and retain top talent — and some demands must be met to preserve millennial employees.

But it’s not all nap-rooms and foosball tables.

As millennials reach professional maturity, they’re looking less for a “fun-zone” and more for a professional “safe-place” — that is to say, a workplace that understands their unique concerns, fears, motivations, and needs.

Organizations focusing on the employee experience are embracing their workforce in ways rarely seen in generations passed, a precedent that will undoubtedly play a much larger role as emerging generations build on this empowered foundation.

However, these same organizations are quickly finding snags along the way. From recruitment processes to off-boarding, ensuring employees receive professional value, satisfaction, and leadership nurturing add heavy workloads to an already hectic schedule.

We recently spoke with Pete Luciano, co-founder of Human Capital Management (HCM) provider Balance Point, about the pains most often discussed with clients about their processes. As Pete puts it, “Employees are your best assets. If the best talent for your organization is hired, trained, and given opportunities to succeed — and even fail productively — you’ll see growth before you know it.”

HCMs offer simple, cost-effective management solutions for these growing problems — but ultimately, the wealth they provide is up to the organization’s unique approach to the software.

Recruitment

Organizations are spending much more on recruiting top talent. Keeping a constant flow of viable candidates is difficult to manage, but an HCM remedies this time-blockage by continuously cataloguing candidates — even if organizations aren’t hiring at that second.

A potential candidate simply navigates to the website, uploads her/his resume, and fills out an application. From the organization’s perspective, managers can perform online applicant searches and track applicants throughout the hiring process.

Onboarding

As Pete says, “using an HCM to automate onboarding processes is administratively more sensible.” In days of yore, HR was responsible for collecting employee information and manually entering it into the organization’s system. With HCM software, the candidates are in control of their own information.

Prior to the start date, W4s, I-9s, employee handbooks, and other documents are accessed and filled out electronically. Giving new-hires access to their own information promotes transparency and trust within the organization — important standards for young people entering the marketplace.

Performance Reviews

Currently undergoing an evolution, performance reviews provide key insight into the successes and coaching necessary to successfully grow employees.

As mentioned in a recent HR Tech Weekly article, “Employees and their managers can work together on creating performance goals annually or bi-annually and track the progress and closure of the same with feedback and ratings as relevant.”

But every organization has a unique approach that speaks directly to their bottom lines.

HCMs automate performance reviews through tiered processes, measuring competency, goals, and the organization’s core values. Of course, HCMs are customizable in this way, giving each organization the opportunity to tailor performance reviews to their specific needs and standards.

HR, Time & Labor Management, Payroll

Giving employees access to their information, documents, pay grades, calendars, and benefits relieves HR of the time it takes to retrieve this information. Because HCMs are known for their simple, user-friendly interface, minimal training is needed to get employees up-to-speed and editing their information when necessary.

Building these workflows individually, without an HCM, takes time and can be cumbersome to navigate. Having everything located in one place makes it much easier for everybody, from leadership to employees, to manage and maintain.

Off-boarding

Employees retire, quit, or are terminated for many different reasons. Exit interviews offer insight into organizations through the lens of an employee who underwent the entire employee experience. Where are improvements needed? What can make the employee experience more appealing for future candidates?

What is done with the information gathered is ultimately up to the organization. However, HCM off-boarding processes ensure the organization gets its property back, terminates benefits, and ensures that nothing falls through the cracks. When it comes to Benefit/ACA reconciliation, people coming and going from the organization’s health insurance can either save or squander funds.

For small and mid-sized businesses looking for efficiency throughout the employee experience, an HCM provides cost-effective solutions to each facet of the employee’s journey while ensuring compliance, simple management, and real-time reporting.


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Future of Work: Using Gamification in the HR

Gamification in HR

Gamification takes the essence of games attributes and techniques that game designers use to engage players and applies these to a range of real-world processes inside a company and to non-game experiences to motivate actions that add value to the business. Gamification is transforming business models by creating new ways to extend relationships, craft longer-term engagement, and drive customer and employee loyalty. It works because it leverages the motivations and desires that exist in all of us for community, feedback, achievement and reward.

Gallup’s latest research shows why companies are increasing their interest in gamification.The Gallup study finds 31% of employees are engaged at work (51% are disengaged and 17.5% actively disengaged). But what is most interesting is how this data compares when you apply a generational segmentation. It turns out Millennials are the least engaged generation with only 28.9% engaged as compared to 32.9% for Gen X & Boomers.

So how can various processes in human resources be “gamified” to provide an opportunity for employees across the generations to increase their levels of engagement, collaboration and recognition in the workplace?

  • Think strategy first: identify and articulate specific business objectives you are trying to achieve with gamification;
  • Understand what motivates your employees: gamification is 75% psychology and 25% technology;
  • Engage employees at the emotional level: more than points, badges and leaderboards, gamification engages at a core emotional level.

HR departments process different kind of tasks, let’s highlight the most likely to be gamified. Take recruiting, for instance. Games offer a natural and fun way for people to explore and learn more about a company and its culture. The recruiting and talent acquisition arenas have experienced the most success to date with incorporating gamification strategies to engage with potential candidates and give them a taste of day-to-day life within a company.

It’s not just recruiting where HR can get into the game. In the landscape of corporate learning and development programs, gamification has potential as well. Interactive games drive employee participation and enable the transfer of educational content in a fun and appealing way. The rewards and incentives built into gaming plays well with performance management, which is a key factor in keeping employees engaged. Companies can employ gamification elements when designing performance plans to entice employees to participate more fully in their own performance planning. This level of HR gamification in performance management is still in its infancy but has the potential to drive high performers to new heights and ultimately enhance a company’s business performance.

Somehow, despite promising success stories, many companies have not embraced gamification as a meaningful solution to industry challenges. Some of the most common barriers to adoption include:

  • A belief that gamification is too expensive. However, companies do not necessarily need to develop a full-fledged game or gaming software to take advantage of gamification.
  • Older executives do not buy into the strategy. Whether your company operates under board management or a chief executive officer, some old-school managers may not understand or approve of gamification in the workplace. Check with the Millennials in the company and get their help in making the case for gamification to the GenX/Baby Boomers.
  • Lack of understanding about gamification. Many businesses today still don’t understand how it works or the range of benefits that accrue to incorporating game-like incentives into workplace activities. More and more companies are using it and talking about the benefits though; so it is becoming easier to explain gamification and to demonstrate its value to those who still don’t get it.

Gamification lead to the one thing that HR just can’t get enough of: data. The increased data generated from gamifying these HR processes means that HR professionals will have more ways than ever to measure the effectiveness of their programs and to make real-time adjustments. Gamification has potential as an important component of a company’s overall HR strategy. The fact is companies that don’t incorporate gaming principles into HR practices risk it being “game over” as the competition passes them by.

Woobe is the best tool for HR professionals to manage and improve internal networking. A solid internal network is required to implement successfully the New World of Work in your company, gamification included. Once again Woobe is on the edge in the future of work: thanks to the mobile application available to all the employees, and the ability to carry out surveys, the more employees use the platform, the more they get points. The HR will therefore have the right support to include gaming features to real-world processes.

Source: Future of work: using gamification in the HR – Woobe

Learn to Love Not Loath the Technical Interview

Job Interview

The Potential Stress of Technical Interviews

Technical recruiters should take heed, it’s really important to help ease the nerves of developers as they prepare for their technical interviews for programming positions. Going in with the right mindset and game-plan is critical for landing the job. Crelate offers some ‘inside’ information from John Franti of Epicodus – a vocational school for aspiring programmers.

The technical interview is the most nerve-wracking part of the hiring process for most new or junior developers. Probably for most developers, full-stop. Programmers with years of accumulated experience and confidence report the same doubts, nerves, and anxieties every time the interviewer points to the whiteboard.

Jerry Maguire

And why wouldn’t we? A search for the term “technical interview” in the Computers & Technology section on Amazon returned 710 responses. Among the books that are “must-haves” for junior developers are Cracking the Coding Interview and Elements of Programming Interviews. Both are great resources and immensely helpful, but if you don’t have time to read the books here are a few things to ponder.

Seemingly Everyone has an Opinion for how to Prepare

Everyone should prepare for any interview, but there can be a hidden message communicated by this flood of guidance, advice, and “insider” information: The technical part of your interview is a terrifying experience that will haunt you and ruin your future.

Additionally, there is no widely acknowledged difference in the literature between the skills needed to successfully interview for a job, or work as a systems architect at Google or Facebook and a junior front-end or back-end developer at an agency, or start-up. To believe the conventional wisdom, everyone needs to be a “10x haxxor”, a “ninja”. This is whatJacob Kaplan-Moss called the Programming Talent Myth. There are few great programmers, and everyone else is untalented and unfit to work as a programmer. Wrong. Instead, Kaplan-Moss tries to enforce the idea that programming skills follow the same bell curve as any other set of skills. By this theory there are a few extremely talented people, a very few uniquely unskilled individuals, and the majority of programmers fall somewhere in the middle of the pack.

It’s no wonder that so many developers suffer from imposter syndrome or even fail to apply for relevant jobs for fear of being unqualified given the high bar of success that is often set. This doesn’t have to be the case. I’ve helped hundreds of students in my role at Epicodus prepare for their very first programming interviews. There are direct carryovers from the skills a person has at the keyboard to the skills needed at the whiteboard.

Think of the Technical Interview as a Conversation

Silicon Valley, Part-1

A good technical interview should be a conversation. It should not be a test of knowledge. A technical interview is best used when it evaluates how a candidate thinks and works, not evaluating what they know. The candidate’s resume, and the non-whiteboard part of the interview should be sufficient to determine if they have experience with the required languages, frameworks, and concepts. As an interviewee, if you’re asked to whiteboard, that’s great news – the interviewer knows you have the skills to work through a difficult question, and wants to see how you do so.

Tips & Tricks for the Technical Interview

So, what are some good practices?

I love the idea of treating each technical question like a mini-project. First, have the interviewer repeat the question. Second, listen carefully, and write down a list of specs. Where? On the whiteboard, of course.

Again, you’re showing how you work. You work from a list of specs, like the good, professional developer you are. Therefore, once the specs are listed, read them back and start looking for keywords and easy requirements that will help you answer the question.

* Are you writing a function? Get the word function and some curly braces up on the board.

* Does the function accept any kind of argument? Get it in the parens.

* Does the function return a value? Let’s put a return statement at the end of the function.

Easy, right?

A Couple More Words of Wisdom

Silicon Valley, Part-2

The purpose of all this boilerplate, or any similar setup is to give ourselves a familiar work space. Further, it’s how we write functions when we’re in our text editor – why would it be any different just because it’s ink and not pixels? It also gets some information on the board, and can get you thinking.

Are you stuck, or do you need to test your algorithm? Draw a box on the whiteboard and list your variables and their initial values inside. This box represents machine memory during the process. Next, pass some test data into your function and talk through the behavior with the interviewer while changing the values within the box. By doing live, manual testing this often can help the interviewee get unstuck.

And of course, it’s alright to say “I don’t know” as long as you finish with the word “…yet.” Then, go forward with the interviewer. How would you go about finding out? What terms would you search for? Where have you seen similar behavior? Keep communicating and showing how you think.

A Note for Interviewers

Finally, for interviewers who may be reading this, because the goal of the technical interview is how we think and not what we know, the question itself doesn’t need to be that hard. A new programmer can show just as much knowledge writing a factorial algorithm as they can solving an advanced sorting problem. The way the thought process is communicated is often what stands out.

You can check out a few more simple tips within my lesson at Learn How to Program.


Source: Learn to Love Not Loath the Technical Interview – Crelate

The Future of Recruiting and Hiring with AI

Future of HR Tech

Talent acquisition can be one of the most time consuming and frustrating aspects of business. Harsh deadlines and specific requirements, not to mention the piles of applications and resumes, is tough for any recruiter. Tack on retention accountability, candidate experience and employer branding and the job becomes even harder. The emerging HR technology throughout the last decade has strived to take away these many frustrations while improving candidate experience and quality of hire.

The buzz around artificial intelligence this year is being shrugged off by many as just a new word HR got ahold of, but what would happen if AI was actually embraced by the recruiting and hiring world? What could it do to further practices and solve problems? This is exactly what Karen.ai are trying to do. How is AI enabled software aiming to better recruitment and the candidate experience?

  1. Candidate Matching

Matching the right candidates to the right positions, that’s the name of the game, but it’s not as easy as it may sound. 52% of recruiters say the hardest part of their job is identifying the right candidates from a large applicant pool. Resume parsing and keyword search advances within an ATS has made the sifting and shifting of this task a bit easier as it picks up on keywords in resumes and cover letters to pull ones that match the most. But as we’ve traversed from keyword matching, to semantic search and contextual search, it’s clear we have not perfected Artificial Intelligence in candidate matching just yet. Today’s products are using Natural Language Processing for even more efficient and learning tools.

75% of job seekers’ chances of landing an interview are killed by errors in the ATS or by restrictive keyword search parameters. Limiting the search to a set amount of keywords does not always guarantee the most qualified candidate or best fit for the job requirements. However, Karen, an Artificial Intelligence software we built specifically for recruiting and hiring, builds off the basic keyword search, broadening the results with a more advanced version that includes semantic search, contextual search and integrates candidate chat conversations, eliminating fuzzy matches.

The ability to find concepts hidden in text, in addition to traditional keyword search will give recruiters a more complete look at the candidate’s qualifications and help improve the candidate matching process. In addition, this new software will take the information learned from the resume and cover letters to potentially help match candidates to jobs they may be better fit for within the company during and after the application process.

  1. Candidate Rank and Score

In addition to pulling out the most qualified candidates for the position based on keywords and concepts, recruiters and hiring managers are expected to then select the best ones to move on in the process. Many use the rank and score method based on what was found within the resume and cover letter. Artificial intelligence is now helping recruiters do this faster by leveraging big data and predictive analytics. Some companies that already do this include Hiredscore and Ideal.com.

While this helps professionals get to the next step in the hiring process quicker, what seems to be missing is the interaction with the candidates and those who did not make it to the next step in the process.

A study conducted by CareerBuilder found an astonishing 75% of people said they didn’t hear back from the company to which they applied. This is where the ATS black hole comes into play and how Artificial Intelligence can help fight it. Karen steps into the process from the beginning, conversing with candidates, learning from their interactions and assimilating the data into a decision: continue down the pipeline or exit in a brand-minded way. In either scenario, Karen ensures the candidate knows where they stand.

  1. Conversation Service for Candidate Engagement and Brand Experience

The ATS black hole is something of which many recruiters and candidates are all too familiar. 74% of job seekers say a clear timeline of the hiring process is what could improve their candidate experience the most, according to a report by applicant tracking systems consulting website Software Advice. Candidates want to be kept in the loop but for many recruiters, staying in contact with all of the applicants and notifying them of each step in the hiring process is next to impossible.

Automated emails have helped this frustration as it’s easy to send an email to a couple dozen candidates letting them know they weren’t the right fit for the position or they are moving on in the process. The problem with this automation, though, is a lack of brand experience and personality. Automated emails are also not as good keeping the candidates fully engaged in the process.

Enter Karen. Chatbots have been affecting our world by advancing customer support to helping users book a flight and now they’re here to advance the world of recruiting. By using an active chatbot to communicate and engage with candidates, AI could solve the problems of the ATS black hole.

A chatbot guides candidates through the application process, take insights learned from resumes and ask candidates questions to assess their level of engagement and keep them informed about where they are in the process. Although platforms like Wade & Wendy and Mya have these abilities as well, Karen is the first to take the information learned from the chat and combine it with the scoring and ranking capabilities to present the recruiter with the best possible candidate for the position. This chat capability will also increase the brand experience for the candidate as 78% of candidates will tell their friends and family about their bad experience and 34% will post about it on social media.

Tie all these functions together and you have a winning combination of matching, scoring and ranking, and chat capabilities that will help ease the recruiter frustrations and build a bridge between the disconnect of employers and job seekers. Prior to the cognitive computing era, enterprise companies would manually review resumes or at best use keyword matching to prioritize internal and external candidate submissions. Using AI, like Karen, to improve these tactics can lower time-to-hire for recruiters and engage candidates.

Want to learn more about Karen? Visit karen.ai or read more about the creation in this press release.

Find Karen on Social Media: Twitter | LinkedIn

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Navigating Recruitment’s Ever-Changing Landscape

Recruitment flat vector illustration

Still struggling to hire the perfect employee every time?

If so, you’re stuck in an older recruitment model that doesn’t reflect the ways that technology has shifted the landscape. Fortunately, getting caught up can be easy, so long as you have built a positive company culture that you can identify and articulate.

Focus on creating a positive employee (and candidate!) experience.

Great employees look for companies they can support for a long time, regardless of how long they end up working there. Mediocre employees take what they can get. Great employees also pass on information to other great employees. If they’ve had a bad experience as a candidate they’ll make sure other candidates know it, which means you’re less likely to hear from the top performers you’re trying to attract.

Ironically, one of the best ways to set your company apart is also one of the simplest and least expensive. Contact candidates even when you don’t intend to hire them. That way, they can get on with their job search. You can also make sure that candidates are being treated with respect at every other phase of the hiring process.

Get proactive about building your hiring pipeline.

It’s hard to hire the perfect employee when you’re desperate or scrambling. Instead, you want to start conversations with interesting candidates long before you have an opening. That means sourcing candidates through social media, attending networking events and holding conversations.

When you find people who are going to be a good cultural fit then keep the lines of communication open with them. Contact them first when a position becomes available, rather than trusting your company’s fate to the job board slush pile.

Get super clear about the role you need to fill.

Don’t just throw down a list of qualifications that have nothing to do with the position. Understand the problems you’re trying to solve by hiring each employee. If you don’t have a problem, then you don’t need to spend money on an employee. It’s that simple!

After you’ve identified the problem, create a persona which tells you all about the type of person who might be perfect to solve these problems. This process is similar to the one the marketing department is already using to create the collateral for your organisation. Knowing exactly what you’re looking for allows you to spot that person from the moment he or she walks in the door. When going through this process, be aware of unconscious bias and your real “must haves” so you don’t just end up with a clone of someone else already in your organisation, adding zero new contribution.

Use data mining and predictive analytics to isolate success factors and eliminate unconscious bias.

Sometimes we don’t get the perfect employees because our own biased brains are incapable of recognising them. When hiring software is properly designed they don’t share those limitations. Hiring tools can help you shortlist candidates who will be perfect for the role. Some software packages even hide information which might taint the way you see the candidate, such as the candidate’s race, name, and gender. You only learn that after you call him or her in for an interview. It’s not a perfect solution for eliminating bias, but it does mean you’re giving the best people a chance to shine in person.

If you’re asking bold interview questions designed to pinpoint the employee’s ability to solve your problems instead of tired old repeats like “why should we hire you” then it will be even easier to spot employees who will be perfect for your organisation, now and in the future.

Want more insight into what you can do to hire the perfect employee every time? Visit this link to download your free copy of “How to Hire the Perfect Employee Every Time.” This comprehensive eBook shares tools, resources, and tips from top CEOs and hiring managers around the world.

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50% Hiring Cost Reduction through increased Quality and Speed: The Nord Stream 2 Project

The Landfall of the Nord Stream Pipeline in Germany

Nord Stream 2 AG is a project company established for the planning, construction and operation of the Nord Stream 2 twin pipeline to transport natural gas from Northern Russia to Europe. New hires were needed for multiple business and technical functions. Nord Stream 2 wanted a data-driven, comprehensive, time saving process that would result in candidates who could immediately fit into their high-speed, international culture and who would produce results on Day One.

Interview/Hiring Ratio of 4:1

With softfactors, Nord Stream 2 soon learned that softfactors’ methodology reflected current research conducted by the Stanford Research Institute International and the Carnegie Melon Foundation showing that job success depends on a combination of technical knowledge and soft skills. They realized that soft skills were valuable factors to consider.

Smart algorithm do the workload

softfactors’ selection tools use an algorithm to compare the job requirements to each candidate’s profile. Candidates interested in a job complete an interactive online application. All candidates are screened on overall fit, traditional variables, and soft factor elements drawn from interactive exercises. The result is a scientifically rigorous list of pre-selected candidates – both suitable and unsuitable – based on a combination of competencies and foundational and technical skillsets.

Saving 20 hours interview time per position

With the front-end sourcing and candidate screening steps handled by softfactors, Nord Stream 2’s HR team was able to concentrate on in-person interviews and collaborative assessment discussions with the hiring managers. It brought down the interview/hiring ratio to 1:4. The number of interviews for hiring managers was reduced by over 50% because of the pre-match of suitable candidates to jobs.

Download the full study here
Nord Stream 2 AG – Facts and Figures
Time Frame for Recruiting 9 months
Online Applications through Softfactors ATS (very specialized jobs) 2’500 applications automatically screened
Algorithm assessed as suitable 450
Hired (filled) positions 45
Hiring/Interview Ratio 1:4,3 (normally 1:10)
Time saving for hiring managers and HR (2 people in interview) 810 hours

About Softfactors AG

Softfactors AG is an HR Tech Startup based in Zurich Switzerland. The recruiting solution measures and compares both resumes and soft skills. It looks at qualifications, work experience, social skills and personality of applicants and compares these with the requirements of the job opening, using a set of competencies and pre-defined job profiles.

www.softfactors.com


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HRs, Beware Of The Continuous Candidates

Split Shire

Loyalty is the quality which is most desirable by any employer. As an HR your motive is not only to hire the ideal candidate possessing impeccable skills for the job, but also retain him. Just imagine this situation, there is a vacant role which has to be filled immediately and you start exploring all the sources through you could possibly hire someone fit, you interview him, put relentless efforts in following up, take care of all the onboarding process, and then maybe a within a couple of months after joining he suddenly decides to leave!

running-men-business

And all your hefty efforts have suddenly gone into waste.

Yes, there is a rise of a new group of candidates termed as ‘Continuous Candidates’ who are always searching for the next job. Every one out of three candidates is a continuous candidate. Now there is a question, who are they and what are their attributes?

Profile Persona of a Continuous Candidate

1.AGE GROUP

Mostly it has been seen that the major part of these candidates fall in the age group of 18-34. They are the predominant job hoppers. This is the age when the zeal is utmost and the passion for growth is high. It has been seen that 70% of the job-hoppers’ age is in the range 25-34.

2.GROWTH

According to a report by Millennial Careers: 2020 Vision, job security is a major factor for the millennials, but their definition of job security is slightly different. They want a secure career first. Career growth is very important maybe not with the same employer. Unlike their preceding generation, they don’t take job security as the way to get married and settle down with kids.

growth_quotes

3.JOB SATISFACTION

They have a lower job satisfaction.They just view a present job as a means of gaining experience and increasing their compensation only because of the plan to move to a different company with a good hike on the existing package. Jobs, for them, are always temporary.

4.ACTIVITY ON RECRUITMENT SITES

Continuous candidates are more active in sites like Linkedin, Naukri, Monster etc. in search for their next dream job. They are knowledgeable indeed, mostly because of the desire to crack a new job. They are better informed about the job market than their non-continuous counterparts.

Now you know who are they, so what do you do? Keep away or analyse the ways to deal with them. Since the numbers of continuous candidates are growing you need to figure out a way to deal with them.They are talented with huge potential, so why not get into the source of their dissatisfaction and retain them instead! Well, we will be answering this in our upcoming article. Each human resource is special, even if they want to leave, you have to make them stay.

bangabdi-roy-chowdhuryHey there, I’m Bangabdi. I’m a Growth Hacker living in Bengaluru, India. I am a fan of dance, writing, and fashion. I’m also interested in politics, economics and travel.

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Source: HRs, Beware Of The Continuous Candidates

Enhancing Your Workplace Performance with 360-Degree Feedback

Written by Steffen Maier. Originally published at Impraise Blog.

Startup Stock Photos

By now, you’re probably familiar with the term 360-degree feedback (If not, check out our handy guide here for an outline and some perks of introducing it into your workplace.)

If you want a feedback process that gets the best from your team and allows them to grow, 360-feedback is the way forward. It’s a collaborative process which eliminates issues that arise when only managers provide insight, instead allowing people to gain a more well-rounded view of their strengths, weaknesses and how they are able to develop within their team.

Self-Awareness & Accountability

Feedback culture can also lead to higher levels of self-awareness. In reviewing their colleagues, people will have an increased awareness of how they perceive others’ workplace behaviours and performance, likely making them more self-aware and therefore better at evaluating and improving their own performance.

People’s motivation comes from knowing that their work is being acknowledged. If there is a consistent culture of constant real-time feedback in place, employees are likely to up their game at work in order to be viewed favorably, making them both more self-aware and more accountable for their performance.

Peers

Although as a manager you have a valuable insight into your employees’ work, their peers will undoubtedly offer a different perspective.

Peer reviews are effective in the sense that people’s colleagues hold a different awareness of their colleagues working styles, interactions and how they’re using their time. This is why 360-degree feedback works. It allows for input to come from a perspective that managers alone may be unable to provide. Gaining performance feedback from someone in another department that you’re currently working closely on a project with is actually likely to be more beneficial than that of your manager who may know little to nothing about the project and the work involved.

When peer evaluation is used alongside managerial feedback, an all-round view can be established; something which is highly useful for team members as they look to improve their performance.

A recent study from Globoforce found that 85% of those who already have peer feedback implemented as part of their performance review feel that they are more appreciated, with 88% also expressing more job satisfaction than those only reviewed by a single supervisor. Feeling such levels of satisfaction can lead to those who are happy and feel appreciated: these are the people that have more reason to exert themselves at work than those who feel undervalued regardless of their efforts.

Research has also found that peer relationships have a huge impact on people’s work lives. Peer camaraderie is the number one reason that people go the extra mile at work: people are more likely to exert themselves if there is a sense that it also benefits their colleagues. Employees that have good relationships with their co-workers, and value them as part of a team, are also likely to value their input and want to improve their performance based on their colleagues’ feedback in order to achieve a better working environment for everyone.

Managers and 360-feedback

It’s also important to acknowledge the ways in which 360- feedback can assist managerial performance. Receiving both positive and constructive feedback from your team members can have hugely beneficial impacts. 360-feedback encourages employees to provide upward feedback on areas that they perhaps wouldn’t have felt able to express without such practices set in place. It’s a unique opportunity to gain new insight into your working style, skill-set, and the way you interact with your team.

Research has found 360-feedback to be incredibly beneficial for managers. Those who were originally rated low or moderately during upward feedback reviews showed improvements over time. In order for it to actually improve performance, however, 360-degree feedback must be met with follow-ups: the same research also established that managers who followed up and discussed their feedback improved more than those who did not.

Alongside 1-on-1 meetings to discuss manager-employee feedback for example, such follow ups could be implemented in the form of quarterly company-wide reviews to establish whether issues that arose have been resolved. This article from APA highlights the importance of following up feedback and the difference it can make.

Real-time, 360-degree feedback is a sure-fire way to improve performance in the workplace. It’s beneficial, whether from having the process implemented to improve people’s work ethic and sense of recognition or the specific feedback received providing people with insights and all-important goals to work towards. The argument for ditching the old-school process of simple manager to employee feedback in favor of the 360 is indisputable.

Using Impraise, you can ensure that feedback is shared amongst all team members, ensuring an open and ongoing conversation about progress and development, all without interrupting your daily work-flow. This is not, of course, to say that performance reviews and digital feedback should replace face-to-face interaction and conversations about progress. Instead, using tools like Impraise to support your current system with real-time, 360-degree feedback helps to create a more communicative, constantly developing and high-achieving team.

About the Author:

steffen-maier

Steffen Maier is co-founder of Impraise a web-based and mobile solution for actionable, timely feedback at work. Based in New York and Amsterdam, Impraise turns tedious annual performance reviews into an easy process by enabling users to give and receive valuable feedback in real-time and when it’s most helpful. The tool includes an extensive analytics platform to analyze key strengths and predict talent gaps and coaching needs.


Source: Advantages of 360-degree feedback to Improve Employee Performance — Impraise Blog – Employee performance management, reviews and 360 feedback