The Aftermath of LinkedIn’s Acquisition

Talent Acquisition

In a world of inexpensive apps, where school children learn Google Docs rather than Microsoft Word or even 365 Office, Microsoft realizes that perhaps it’s time to expand its platform and data applications. And talent acquisition is it. In recruiting, we realized this the moment the software giant purchased LinkedIn for over $26 billion dollars, in the largest purchase the Redmond-based behemoth has ever made.

I wrote about the acquisition shortly after it happened for The HR Tech Weekly® and I, like many in the talent acquisition space, have been watching closely to see how the HUGE buy will affect the rest of the space. A lot of predictions were initially thrown around (mine included) that surmised the two companies might:

Create an integrated talent management platform. Matt Charney posited that they could platform could offer advanced analytics capabilities which go a long way in making the life of HR professionals easy. Charney suggested that Yammer, Sharepoint, LinkedIn and Excel could all make recruiting and HR analytics play very nicely together and create an end-to-end source of truth using tools that many HR and Recruiting professionals use every day.

Allow Bing and LinkedIn to take on the Indeeds of the world. Charney goes on to make one of the most insightful predictions:

“I imagine that LinkedIn will become the exclusive provider of job content for Bing and its ad network, which is a huge business (it’s the reason Monster bought HotJobs! and Indeed bought Simply Hired). LinkedIn has been trying to break into the marketing solutions and display ad business for some time, but this fast tracks those efforts by providing the ability for clients to do things like behavioral targeting, beaconing and buying inventory across multiple mediums, enhancing the potential value of buying a LinkedIn job slot and certainly guaranteeing increased visibility for job postings and better ROI and insights into ad spend efficacy.”

And he wasn’t the only one. Pretty much everyone is anticipating that the search and advertising ramifications are pretty much a given. Ginny Marvin, writing for MarketingLand, laid out some additional predictions, which included more refined targeting for B2B advertisers and more reach with the addition of the LinkedIn universe of 433 million users.

Build a professional universe. William Haskins, an analyst at Wainhouse Research LLC wrote:

“When integrated properly, the existing [LinkedIn] graph can provide a valuable profile view for meeting attendees from outside your organization.”

Microsoft outlined a vision for an Intelligent Newsfeed as a “new daily habit” in the acquisition deck — a newsfeed that will unify data “for every professional to stay connected with the happenings in their network, industry and profession.” This could allow professionals to connect with other professionals, both inside their companies and outside, increasing talent mobility and impacting an imminent contingent workforce.

Make an e-learning powerhouse. The professional universe outlined before takes on new meaning when you consider how LinkedIn’s acquisition of Lynda could impact e-learning within the enterprise. Phani Madhav had this to say:

“The video-learning platform was acquired by LinkedIn in 2015, could aid Microsoft’s efforts to increase its share in the technology-enabled learning market. With the enterprise video market likely to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.7% between 2015-20 and touch the 36.84 billion USD mark at the end of the five year period, Microsoft got the timing of the acquisition perfectly right.”

The Microsoft acquisition of LinkedIn creates a massive void in the space, particularly for social search engines.

“Those who were willing to pay $8000 or more for a seat on LinkedIn Recruiter will now have to decide if they want to re-up those contracts as Microsoft takes over (and potentially uses the data for its own purposes). Companies like Entelo, HiringSolved and Jibe will all be vying for leadership roles now that the big fish is gone. This climate will be similar to the SAP/SuccessFactors/Jobs2Web dust up that happened in 2011 in terms of deal structure and market movement.” (It is worth noting here that Entelo is uniquely poised to rocket to first place from a social search and recruiting engine perspective, having announced its own $12 million round just two weeks before the LinkedIn Announcement.)

This is my own prediction, from The HR Tech Weekly®, and so far, we’re not seeing it come true… just yet. However, there was and continues to be a flurry of investment and M&A activity within the space, with no slowdown in immediate site. It could be that the rest of the world is sitting up and taking notice that a massive player doubled down on talent acquisition technology.

Many of our predictions will need years, not weeks to come to fruition, but the aftermath in the talent acquisition markets is clear. Our own ecosystem, which tracks the movement of talent acquisition technologies through the Source, Engage and Hire stages, will see LinkedIn moved from the social network and candidate focused quadrant (where it currently sits) into some hybrid of the job board and social search engine area (where many of its predicted successors sit).

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What’s plain to me is that the aftermath of the LinkedIn acquisition for LinkedIn seems firmly rooted in talent management while the aftermath for recruiters and those who work in talent acquisition will be the rapid movement of social search engines jockeying for position to take its place.

About the Author

Brian Delle Donne Headshot for WordPressBrian Delle Donne, President of Talent Tech Labs, the only hyper-focused incubator and accelerator program focused exclusively on talent acquisition technology. Talent Tech Labs is seen as a thought leader in all aspects of the talent acquisition technology ecosystem and have extensive relations with all the emerging companies servicing this dynamic market. Today the company has additional investors but continues its tight vertical focus on the talent acquisition process; from recruitment, candidate engagement up until hiring. In addition to accelerating the startups TTL enrolls, the company has become the “go to” source of data and analysis on all the developments in the talent acquisition technology space. 


If you want to share this article the reference to Brian Delle Donne and and The HR Tech Weekly® blog is obligatory. blog is obligatory.

‘Next Generation’ recruitment technology start-up CandidateID going live

Hire Faster, Higher Quality

Disruptive ‘next generation’ recruitment technology start-up, CandidateID is going live to the market on 1st September 2016. CandidateID is innovative talent generation management software that promises to deliver the most accurate insights available for individual candidates in a company’s recruitment database. Founded by Scot McRae and Adam Gordon, CandidateID was recognised earlier this year as a company of significant scale potential.

Supported since March 2016 by Scottish Enterprise’s High Growth Start-up Unit, CandidateID will be building a team of thirty in Scotland over the next twelve months in what will prove to be another exciting technology development for Scotland’s growing tech scene. CandidateID has been working on a private beta basis with a number of the world’s leading employers, and has assembled an advisory board which includes international recruitment leaders at Aviva, Barclays, Philips, Quintiles, Telefonica and Carillion.

CandidateID aims to improve quality of hire and reduce time and cost-per-hire. The software allows organisations to both create and communicate regularly with talent pools, as well as generate key individual candidate insights so recruiters know exactly who to talk to first whenever a vacancy arises.  The product’s candidate scoring system, the ‘IDScore’, allows unique insights that identify the candidate’s level of interest in new job opportunities, and means the hiring company can reach out to high quality, ‘hire-ready’ candidates.

Scot McRaeScot McRae is Managing Director of marketing automation experts McRae & Co who work with Spartan Solutions, Spoonfed, Iceptope and Jumpstart and Co-Founder of CandidateID. Scot said, “Candidate behaviour has changed and how candidates process important decisions is continuously evolving. CandidateID allows companies to adapt to these changes and approach candidates in a different way. Rather than casting a wide net, the unique scoring system allows recruiters to identify and target the candidates that are highly engaged with their content and the best fit for their organisation.”

Adam GordonAdam Gordon is Co-Founder of CandidateID and Managing Director of talent generation experts Social Media Search, whose clients include Thermo Fisher Scientific, Grant Thornton, Weetabix and Webhelp. Adam said, “CandidateID takes some of the very best thinking from sales and marketing and applies it to recruitment seamlessly. I’ve always said recruitment is a sales and marketing discipline and it’s now being proven. The thing that fascinates me most about CandidateID is its ability to score individual candidates’ engagement in real time so recruitment teams know precisely who to talk to first when the vacancy comes live.”


Further information or interview requests can be directed to Emma Baxter (emmabaxter@socialmediasearch.co.uk)

Salary Transparency is Coming Like a Freight Train… Get On Board or Get Run Over

Keep Salary Expectations on Track Through Transparenecy

By revealing company salary ranges and fostering a salary transparent society, companies immediately begin accruing both short-term and long-term benefits. Integral to the process is an introspective analysis that creates a greater understanding of what the company values and what they don’t. Companies with clearly defined parameters receive more targeted interest from candidates who have identified the company as being able to fulfill their needs. Interviewing and on-boarding processes are elevated by data-driven discussions. On the job, fewer doubts about compensation frees up employees’ mental energies to focus on the tasks at hand. Employees are also better able to visualize the long-term benefits of remaining with the company. A company opening its books and revealing specific salaries and salary ranges in terms of location and experience level may seem as if it is shooting itself in the foot in the short run, but, given the long view, salary transparency enhances productivity, retention, and quality.

Chris Bolte
Chris Bolte, CEO & Co-Founder at Paysa

While nobody expects companies to universally release every one of their employees’ compensation-related data for the general public to scrutinize, several companies are already doing so. Buffer, creator of a social media management tool, releases up to date salaries for each employee. Companies and individuals wary of an invasion of privacy will appreciate the middle ground Buffer took a stand on with a salary calculator it developed that incorporates factors such as a candidate’s role, experience level, desired location, and preference for higher or lower risk compensation package (equity vs. salary). There are a number of available options when it comes to salary transparency methodology.

Making Progress Toward Transparency

Regardless of the path a company chooses, the track leading toward long-term success involves several stops along the way that facilitate salary transparency and better-informed candidates. In any company, there will always be individuals determined to fight sharing salary-related data. Pushback from guarded employees and well-meaning human resources personnel may result in a temporary thinning of the ranks. The potentially painful transition to providing salary transparency is streamlined with thorough preparation involving organizational introspection and deep market research. First, companies must delve deep into their own needs to understand what skills, traits, and experiences are important to the company. Dissect these components to ascertain why they hold value. It should be apparent what each skill, trait, or experience adds to the company, leading to its continued success.

Before leveraging the benefits of salary transparency, companies must clearly define their compensation processes. Companies must determine the average salary for each position and clarify how those are established. Companies should be able to explain why an employee’s compensation falls at a certain spot within a range. What an employee needs to accomplish in order to move up within a pay range must be clear and transparent. Candidates approaching a company with well-defined values and needs should carefully assemble a portfolio that highlights their skillsets, character traits, and experiences as related to the value they will contribute to the company.

Salary transparency should inform the interview process as well. Those company needs should be juxtaposed against the backdrop of the broader market’s needs. Market research and analysis should lead to establishing updated benchmarks pertaining to skills and experience. Because market values change rapidly, especially in the tech industry, relying on dated benchmarking techniques with a narrow perspective cripples the hiring process and sets companies up for failure from the outset.

Salary Transparency Enhances Long-Term Productivity

The effort required, the difficulties to overcome, and pushback from both outside and within shouldn’t deter a company from achieving salary transparency. In addition to ameliorating conditions for employees, companies benefit in numerous ways from both individually and collectively enacting initiatives that promote salary transparency. Beyond simply staying relevant to the needs of the next generation of job seekers, companies that promote salary transparency have a better understanding of their own values in terms of desired skills, which makes hiring easier. Once an employee is on-boarded, conversations about their value to the company, as well as how to enhance it, are much more data-driven. Providing access to data on salaries, not only within the company, but across a market segment, also dispels any doubts regarding compensation. Rather than focusing on whether or not they are getting paid adequately, employees focus on doing their job and growing their career. This improves both productivity, as employees know what the company values and how they can impact that, as well as retention rates, as employees are more productive and rewarded, while less likely to leave looking for a better deal.

While salary transparency may result in companies losing control over salary negotiations and other minor aspects of candidate interviews, it generates real benefits that extend to employees, the company, and beyond. Salary transparency not only contributes to rectifying societal wrongs, such as gender and ethnic wage gaps, but also helps individuals both understand their present salary and see more clearly the track toward greater pay. For companies, salary transparency is an invaluable tool that enhances hiring, as well as long-term employee satisfaction, retention, and productivity.


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Employee Onboarding – Engaging With New Talent in the First 90 Days

Your employees are your talent and your greatest assets. You need to make sure they are happy at every step! One of the most critical functions in this endeavor is employee onboarding. Employee onboarding does not end on day 1! In fact, real work towards onboarding an employee starts from here.

Getting your onboarding strategy right is extremely crucial. Taking care of the first day is important, but you also need to have a strategy laid out for the coming days. Shockingly, one of every 25 employees leaves on their very first day! And this trend is only getting worse with the rise of the millennials, since they are always open to new and better employment opportunities!

What are the steps that need to be taken in order to ensure that the new recruits make a successful transition to your organization?

Achieving this would require you to pay attention to how you are promoting your organization’s culture as well as how are you maintaining it to gain a competitive edge over similar players in the industry. The first 90 days are extremely important as they will decide whether you were able to create an active culture which gets the best out of your new hires or made the employees hate themselves for joining your organization because of your detached and poor onboarding techniques.

1. Start from Day 1

Your culture building process should start from day 1, where you find unique and exciting ways of making the employee feel special and warmly welcomed. A good idea for this could be to reduce the amount of paperwork which is generally a common formal procedure. Instead, make the first day full of interactions and devoid of any boring, mundane signature work. Instead, work on giving your employees an experience that they would want to share with their friends and family! This does not require you to plan extravagant sessions! Keep it simple and small. You can start with welcoming them with a gift box and ensuring that a team lunch is arranged so that they interact with their team mates.

2. Keep a constant check

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via GIPHY

You cannot abandon your employees once they are hired. Do not leave them all by themselves to do their tasks. Keep a check on how they are doing and be their buddy in helping and supporting them at every step. Everyone likes a little extra attention in the beginning and doing this would make them feel a part of the company. Being a good mentor will not only help you get the best out of the new employees, but can also give your business tremendous payoffs in the years to come.

3. Train on essential skills

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via GIPHY

Not all employees come to a new job with the required skills. In order to retain new hires, you will have to ensure that employees feel like they are growing in terms of the knowledge that they are gaining. Employers must educate new hires on how to best perform the tasks and responsibilities assigned to them. Assuming new employees know everything when they join could be one of the biggest mistakes you could make.

Onboard your new hires with Capabiliti’s Solution

4. Make an announcement

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via GIPHY

It might get really awkward for a new joinee to come to work unannounced as all the existing staff might treat him like an alien. In such a scenario, the exchange between existing employees and the new hires might get awkward as no one was informed. To do away with this, make sure you make a loud announcement in the best way possible to the entire office about who is going to join them and as what so that additional confusion can be done away with. Send in a mail prior to their joining date so that everyone is informed well in advance and also keep the desks to be occupied clean and ready.

5. Set clear goals

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For the first 90 days, your strategy should be set. Define the route that new hires need to follow and what is it that is expected out of them in the first 90 days. Make sure you create a supportive environment which motivates the employees to achieve their best and give them whatever resources are required for them to do this successfully. If employees have a direction, they will feel like working towards achieving something and also see how well they fit in that professional set up. Their performance will also give you an indication of their skill sets and areas they need focus on.

6. Focus on real-time feedback

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via GIPHY

Ignoring an employee just because he is just a few weeks old in the company might affect employee’s motivation levels adversely. Their performance would require close monitoring and their managers will have feedback at every point. Make sure that feedback reaches them constantly so that they can keep a note of it themselves and strive to do better. Avoid accumulating everything for the performance review at the end of six months. Such a prolonged interaction might demotivate your employees and deflate their confidence levels.

Tired of running around for feedback? Sign up free on Capabiliti by Qustn, create a feedback questionnaire in minutes, and shoot it out to everyone in your organization now!

7. Engage with interactive conversations

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via GIPHY

Whenever there is any interaction, make sure there is a lot of questions and answers involved. You need to ask questions to new hires about their work and experience and also encourage them to ask you as many questions as they want. Be patient, kind and understanding while answering their queries and do not get bogged down by the level of support that might be on demand. Encourage an open environment where everybody’s voice could be heard.

8. Introduce key stakeholders

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via GIPHY

For any new employee, it is important that they are told about who the important people are and how they are placed in the formal hierarchy. It is always a good idea when the employee knows who is in what role and why some people are so important. Also spend some time explaining the main people and their fun characteristics. Be as humble as you can and tell them about stories that have shaped the company.

You need to go out of your way to in the first 90 days and commit to make the employees feel welcomed and valued. Managers should ensure that new recruits are commended and applauded for their little achievements every now and then. Managers should also meet with their new employees at regular intervals to make sure they discuss their career goals and what methods need a different outlook.

The values and vision of their company should be reminded of as and when possible so that goals are in alignment to them. The manager employee relationship needs to be at a human level and should not be a chance to exercise tyranny. The culture needs to open where there is a scope for constant communication and exchange of ideas. New employees also need to have avenues for relaxation and fun filled days on working days as well.

Take a look at this infographic on employee onboarding strategies at Facebook, Google and Apple

About the Author

Bhaswati BhattacharrayaBhaswati is a Product Specialist at Capabiliti, a mobile-first training and engagement solution for enterprises. Passionate about Economics, Bhaswati also loves storytelling. She has a keen interest in start-ups, food and travel. In her ‘me time’ she picks up fiction novels, tries different cuisines or explores routes to less traveled places on the world map. Follow her on Twitter at @Bhaswatibh


Source: Employee Onboarding – Engaging With New Talent in the First 90 Days

Three Steps to Effectively Measure Philanthropic Impact

Written by Burt Cummings, CEO at Versaic | Originally published at Versaic Blog

According to The Council on Foundations (COF) Report, Increasing Impact & Enhancing Value, corporate philanthropy is as vital as ever to business and society. And yet corporate leaders are under increasing pressure to connect the value of their programs with performance drivers that matter in the business. They must demonstrate that their philanthropic investment is both effective and aligned with business outcomes. Quantifying results is not always easy and many leaders struggle to measure the social impact of their programs. While they’ve often identified broad focus areas for their program, they can find it difficult to create clear social impact metrics that can bridge their philanthropic outcomes to their business strategy.

There are no universally accepted metrics for measuring either the social impact of philanthropy or the Return On Investment (ROI) of philanthropic initiatives. Each company is unique in both their social impact goals and in their requirements for how to demonstrate the ROI. It can be difficult to translate the large-scale vision of what they hope to achieve into tangible success measures.  They struggle to find effective ways to track changes in behavior or condition for the nonprofits and community members they serve.

Burt Cummings, CEO at Versaic for HRTW
Burt Cummings, CEO at Versaic

Versaic client Starwood Hotels & Resorts is an example of an organization committed to investing the time and resources necessary to put a corporate philanthropy program in place that delivers significant value to the community as well as to the company and its employees. Starwood worked with Versaic and The Rensselaerville Institute (TRI) to develop a results-focused approach and implementation plan for their corporate philanthropy initiatives. Starwood’s primary objective was to employ new tools that would automate the process and improve their ability to track, quantify and evaluate impact. Their system is now live, and as a result, their philanthropy team has freed up time and gathered better data so they can have more productive interactions with grantees and effectively measure the results of their programs .

Here are some of the key things we learned about how to design and implement a successful program from our journey with Starwood and TRI: 

1) Create a strategic focus area(s): To identify focus areas that would address the most pertinent needs of the community while capitalizing on Starwood’s strengths, the Social Responsibility team looked internally for guidance. After multiple stakeholder interviews, focus groups and strategy sessions evaluating different aspects of the business, the team identified five focus areas that align community development objectives with Starwood’s strategic goals:

  • Workplace Readiness
  • Community Vitality
  • Conservation
  • Disaster Relief
  • Human Rights

2) Formulate a Plan: With the focus areas in place, Starwood developed a framework to plan and assess the effectiveness of their giving. TRI helped Starwood shift its mindset from acting as a ‘funder’ to acting as an ‘investor’ in order to seek the highest human gain for the available dollars. With that perspective, the foundation staff created a strategic results framework to clarify goals for their signature program grants.

Here are some basic questions to ask when establishing a result framework:

  • What changes do we want to see for the people or places we want to support?
  • What are the predictive changes in behavior or condition that indicate those people and places are on their way to success?
  • What types of programs and services will we invest in to get the end result?
  • What type of investments will we make to affect the change we seek? Will our portfolio include programmatic, capacity building and systemic change grants?

Below is an example from Starwood showing its results framework for its Workplace Readiness program.

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3) Design an Effective System: For Starwood it was essential to make their team and systems as streamlined and efficient as possible. They knew they needed to automate the process, and wanted an automation partner who could integrate their results framework throughout the system workflow. They needed a system flexible enough to track the specific outcome data points they required.

Starwood’s application process and communication system process addresses the following needs:

  • Educate grantees on the company’s philanthropic objectives
  • Clearly communicate their criteria for support
  • Help potential partners understand how they can engage with the organization.
  • Collect all relevant information required to make funding decisions
  • Collect necessary data to assess ROI and support impact reporting

By taking the time up front to design the right questions, Starwood now collects all the necessary information from charitable partners, from initial proposal through impact data collected post-grant. As a result, the team can demonstrate how their investments in local non-profits focused on building employments skills have resulted in a much better pool of potential employees. This is a clear win for Starwood and for the communities where they do business.

Conclusion:

If you’re daunted by the prospect of putting an impact-focused program in place, start by asking yourself, your team and your stakeholders questions about what you want to accomplish in your business and community. Use those answers and the three steps outlined above to develop a process that will deliver the results you want to accomplish. Be prepared to adapt as you go because even with the best plan in place your programs will continually evolve, just as the needs of your business and community change. Connecting and reporting social impact with ROI requires refinement as you learn from experience.

When you take this approach, you’ll respond more effectively to the needs of your community partners, your stakeholders and your social investing team while at the same time increase your impact. It certainly worked for Starwood. Read the full story of Starwood’s journey, Going From Strategy to Impact to learn more. 


Source: Three Steps to Effectively Measure Philanthropic Impact

Epicor Continues Cloud-First Strategy Rollout with the Middle East

Information-Technology-and-Cloud-Computing-1024x870

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, August 15, 2016.

Epicor to Utilise Microsoft Azure in Its Move to Lead with Cloud Deployments for Epicor ERP in the GCC Countries and Egypt.

As more enterprises in the Middle East, including the Global Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and Egypt are looking to leverage post-modern enterprise resource planning (ERP) platforms and tools to move faster, work smarter and grow their business, Epicor Software Corporation, a global provider of industry-specific enterprise software to promote business growth, today announced its new cloud-first strategy for Epicor ERP deployments in the region. This follows an earlier announcement where Epicor said that it had chosen the Microsoft Azure Datacenter in Singapore to support new cloud deployments in Asia.

Sabby Gill - EVP - Epicor
Sabby Gill, Executive Vice President, Epicor Software

Commenting on the regional launch, Sabby Gill, Executive Vice President for Epicor International said, “Over the last couple of years, we have seen a growing appetite for cloud solutions from existing and new customers. Rolling out our cloud-first strategy in the Middle East means ERP customers in the region can now leverage cloud deployment benefits including business consistency, worry-free security, hassle free upgrades, reduced risk and faster time to value. Perhaps most importantly, given the current economic climate with depressed oil-prices, cloud solutions also offer lower total cost of ownership (TCO)”.

According to a report by Forrester Research, “No longer a tactical solution, cloud is a strategic enabler of connected economies. Technology leaders will orchestrate cloud ecosystems, connecting employees, customers, partners, vendors, and devices to serve rising customer expectations.”[1]

Epicor has made it easy for organisations to utilise the cloud to take advantage of a new cloud-first era of service delivery and flexibility, where ERP is delivered as a service and accompanied by value-added services to ensure scalability, security and business continuity. Building on the momentum of its successful move of hundreds of multi-tenant Epicor cloud customers to the new Epicor ERP 10.1 release in the United States and parts of Asia, Epicor is now expanding its global cloud footprint in the Middle East and Egypt.

Epicor ERP Cloud is based on the next-generation Epicor ERP solution. The on-demand system leverages core functionality that has been in use and proven at thousands of customer sites over the past 25 years. Recently recognized as a finalist in the 2016 SaaS Awards program, Epicor ERP in the cloud combines the rich feature set of Epicor ERP with the business and technical benefits of cloud deployment. The cloud-based ERP eliminates the need for separate applications, spreadsheets and “one off” processes and provides all the tools needed to manage opportunities, orders, and operations in one integrated web-based ERP solution.

“The Epicor ERP solution has been one of the strengths and indispensable tools of our business processes for the last six years,” said Raheel Shamim, business systems manager for Al Rajhi Holding Group, Building Solution Sector. “The decision by Epicor to roll out a cloud offering is not only a testament to their commitment to ensuring they provide us with best-of-breed solutions but the new strategy also affords us more choice and additional flexibility and agility, which is vital to our business growth.”

Strengthening the Partner Value Proposition

The Company’s decision to offer cloud solutions in the region has also been warmly received by the partner community. “As a channel partner, our ability to compete and stay relevant in the market hinges on us tailoring our business model to be in line with the latest technology and customer buying models. I see building a cloud practice as key to this strategy. By offering cloud solutions, Epicor is helping us on this journey by allowing us to strengthen our value proposition to both our existing and new customers”, said Vetri Selvan, managing partner for RheinBrücke IT Consulting, an Epicor partner and the winner of a 2016 Stevie award under the category of IT Specialist of the Year – Technology and Architecture.

He concluded, “The Epicor cloud offering aligns directly to our vision of helping our clients quickly adapt to a changing marketplace by ensuring that their business ecosystems are relevant, efficient and perfectly tuned. Through our consulting, technology and Epicor cloud solutions, we will be able to help our clients stay ahead of competition, grow quickly and become more profitable, at the same time affording us the opportunity to grow our revenues and margins.”

Flexible Foundation for Growth

The award-winning Epicor ERP boasts a flexible business architecture built for multitenancy that is ideal for cloud deployments. Epicor gives businesses the ability to grow with the system however deployed — multitenant, single tenant, or on premises — a unique value proposition because it’s the same code base regardless of how a company decides to deploy the solution. Epicor is initially utilising the Microsoft Azure Datacenter to support Epicor Cloud ERP deployments in the region.

Epicor Cloud ERP is available now to new and existing customers in the Middle East and Egypt. For details about the availability of specific features or availability in specific countries, contact your Epicor account manager or channel partner. For more information on Epicor Cloud ERP, please call +971 (0) 4 391 3730 or email info@epicor.com. 

[1] Forrester Research, Inc., “Cloud Powers The New Connected Economy,” by Liz Herbert and Dave Bartoletti (May 27, 2016)

About Epicor Software Corporation

Epicor-Logo-Med-Blue-RGB-GB-1015

Epicor Software Corporation drives business growth. We provide flexible, industry-specific software designed around the needs of our manufacturing, distribution, retail, and service industry customers. More than 40 years of experience with our customers’ unique business processes and operational requirements are built into every solution―in the cloud, hosted, or on premises. With this deep understanding of your industry, Epicor solutions manage complexity, increase efficiency, and free up resources so you can focus on growth. For more information, connect with Epicor or visit www.epicor.com.

Epicor and the Epicor logo are trademarks of Epicor Software Corporation, registered in the United States and other countries. Other trademarks referenced are the property of their respective owners. The product and service offerings depicted in this document are produced by Epicor Software Corporation.

Contacts:

Ahmad Sameer, EpicorAhmad Sameer

Field Marketing Manager, Epicor Middle East, Africa and India

+971 4 3913730 | asameer@epicor.com

 

Vernon SaldanhaVernon Saldanha

Procre8 (on behalf of Epicor)

+971 52 288 0850 | vernon@procre8.biz

 

Are CEO’s Missing out on Big Data’s Big Picture?

Big data allows marketing and production strategists to see where their efforts are succeeding and where they need some work. With big data analytics, every move you make for your company can be backed by data and analytics. While every business venture involves some level of risk, with big data, that risk gets infinitesimally small, thanks to information and insights on market trends, customer behaviour, and more.

Unfortunately, however, many CEOs seem to think that big data is available to all of their employees as soon as it’s available to them. In one survey, nearly half of all CEOs polled thought that this information was disseminated quickly and that all of their employees had the information they needed to do their jobs. In the same survey, just a little over a quarter of employees responded in agreement.

Great Leadership Drives Big Data

In entirely too many cases, CEOs look at big data as something that spreads in real-time and that will just magically get to everyone who needs it in their companies. That’s not the case, though. Not all employees have access to the same data collection and analytics tools, and without the right data analysis and data science, all of that data does little to help anyone anyway.

In the same study that we mentioned above, of businesses with high-performing data-driven marketing strategies, 63% had initiatives launched by their own corporate leaders. Plus, over 40% of those companies also had centralized departments for data and analytics. The corporate leadership in these businesses understood that simply introducing a new tool to their companies’ marketing teams wouldn’t do much for them. They also needed to implement the leadership and structure necessary to make those tools effective.

Great leaders see big data for what it is – a tool. If they do not already have a digital strategy – including digital marketing and production teams, as well as a full team for data collection, analytics, data science, and information distribution – then they make the moves to put the right people in the right places with the best tools for the job.

Vision, Data-Driven Strategy, and Leadership Must Fit Together

CEOs should see vision, data-driven strategy, and leadership as a three-legged chair. Without any one of the legs, the chair falls down. Thus, to succeed a company needs a strong corporate vision. The corporate leadership must have this vision in mind at all times when making changes to strategy, implementing new tools and technology, and approaching big data analytics.

At the same time, marketing and production strategies must be data-driven, and that means that the employees who create and apply these strategies must have full access to all of the findings of the data collection and analysis team. They must be able to make their strategic decisions based directly on collected data on the market, customer behaviour, and other factors.

To do all this, leadership has to be in place to organize all of strategic initiatives and to ensure that all employees have everything they need to do their jobs and move new strategies forward.

Have you implemented a digital strategy for your business? What’s changed since you’ve embraced your strategy, and what are your recommendations for strategy and data-driven technology for business owners and executives like yourself?

Let us know what you think and how you’ve used your digital strategy to set your business apart from the the competition.

To learn more about the world of Entrepreneurship & Data Science follow Bob Nieme on Twitter or connect with him on Linkedin

CEO at O2MC I/O Prescriptive Computing

 

Connect with author Ronald van Loon to learn more about the possibilities of Big Data

Co-author, Director at Adversitement

 

 


Source: Are CEO’s Missing out on Big Data’s Big Picture?

The HR Tech Weekly® Awarded Top 100 HR Blogs for Human Resource & Talent Management Experts

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List of top 200 HR blogs for Human Resource & Talent Management experts ordered by popularity based on search engine ranking, content quality and popularity on social networks.

In order to be included, each blog was required to meet several criteria:

  • Contribute thoughtful insights and analysis to the HR community
  • Offer a unique voice and perspective
  • Have a loyal following and readership
  • Publish content at least once a month

These blogs are ranked based on following criteria

  1. Google reputation and Google search ranking
  2. Influence and popularity on Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites
  3. Quality and consistency of posts.
  4. Feedspot’s editorial team and expert review

Top 100 HR Blogs Winners

Top 100 HR Blogs AwardCONGRATULATIONS to every blogger that has made this Top HR blogs list! This is the most comprehensive list of top Human Resource blogs on the Internet and we are honoured to be as part of this!

The HR Tech Weekly® has the honour of displaying the special badge on our site.

Thank your very much to all and everybody in our fabulous international team of contributors! There wouldn’t be any success without you. You guys rock! True and proud!

Thanks Feedspot for this incredible opportunity!


Source: Top 100 HR Blogs for Human Resource & Talent Management Experts

Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters

Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends 2016:

Over the past few years major disruptions have occurred in HR and corporate structures and organizations. Recently, Deloitte conducted a comprehensive global study of human capital trends and published those findings in a robust report titled: Global Human Capital Trends (GHCT) 2016–The New Organization: Different by Design. According to the researchers, “Sweeping global forces are reshaping the workplace, the workforce, and work itself.” The findings in this report are incredibly relevant and important for professional recruiters to be aware of and potentially take action on.

The data were compiled from more than 7,000 survey responses from corporate leaders in over 130 countries around the world. This blog post will present a few of the highlights from the report that will impact recruiting/hiring now and in the future.

The knowledge and wisdom gained from this study are two-fold for recruiting agencies, corporate recruiters, executive search firms, and/or legal search firms: (1) The study offers ideas for how recruiting agencies might want to run their businesses, and (2) The investigation provides many ‘nuggets’ of information into how your potential customers are running their organizations. If you have this knowledge it can only help you gain an advantage in the hyper-competitive world of professional recruiting. Part of running a successful business is truly understanding the ‘business challenges’ that your customers face on a daily basis.

The researchers begin by identifying 4 overarching changes that are affecting corporate structures: Demographic shifts (50-60% of workforce are millennials); Pressure for Increased Speed for Time to Market (rapid disruption of business models); Digital everywhere; and a Different Social Contract for Workers.

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The top 10 trends identified were: Organizational Design, Leadership, CultureEngagement, Learning, Design ThinkingChanging Skills of the HR OrganizationPeople Analytics, Digital HR, and Workforce Management.

Three of these trends (Organizational design, Culture, and Engagement) will be discussed. After summarizing the high points of the report on these three key trends I’ll point out ways these items will specifically impact recruiting and talent management.

Organizational Design & Structure

One key point of departure identified, in the study, was significant changes in organizational structure. The authors concur, “as companies strive to become more agile and customer-focused, organizations are shifting their structures from traditional, functional models toward interconnected, flexible teams.” Another way to think about the trend toward teams would be viewing them through the prism of a Hollywood movie production team and less like traditional corporate structures. Essentially, akin to a movie-set, people are coming together to tackle projects, then disbanding and moving on to new assignments once the project is complete.

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The implication for professional recruiters is re-thinking your organizational design in order to parlay the benefits of teams instead of the more traditional structure focused primarily on individuals doing specific tasks. In other words, professional recruiters would be encouraged to work together to connect talented people with amazing opportunities, instead of working ‘alone’ to achieve these goals (presumably working individually on a list of candidates and clients).

Here are a few suggestions that the GHCT study offers:

  • Looking at your organizations design: think about re-organization that includes “mission-driven” teams focused on customers, markets, or products. Perhaps it makes sense to assign a ‘team’ of recruiters/hiring managers to work on one specific job type or talent pool.
  • Critically analyzing your rewards and goals: think about your performance management around ‘team performance’ and ‘team leadership’ rather than focusing solely on individual performance. Moreover, reward people for project results, collaboration, and helping others. If a team is assigned to find talent for a specific client incentivize a team of 5 to get 25 placements done this quarter (instead of placing the task of each individual recruiter to get 5 placements on their own).
  • Implementing new team-based tools: put in place tools and measurement systems that encourage people to move between teams, and share information and collaborate with other teams. For recruiters this would mean structuring your firm in a way that encourages team members to work together to achieve company-wide goals for placements. Also, this would encourage communication and networking to ensure that the entire team/company is being successful.
  • Allowing teams to set their own goals: teams should be held accountable for results – but let them decide how to perform, socialize, and communicate these goals among the team. Instead of managers mandating what the goals are, allow the teams to collectively and creatively come up with ways to be held to account for their performance measurable’s.

Shaping Culture

Another vital trend in this study was the impact of culture on business strategy. The authors define culture as, “the way things work around here”. Also, culture is the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shape how real work gets done within an organization. As opposed to seeing culture as primarily an HR issue/problem, “CEOs and executive teams should take responsibility for an organization’s culture (with HR supporting that responsibility through measurement, process, and infrastructure).” Leaders should embody and actively engage in the kind of ‘culture’ they want their teams to reflect.

Interestingly, 28% of survey respondents believe they understand their culture well, while only 19% believe they have the ‘right culture.’ Change is so prevalent for organizations in 2016 that an effective culture can be the determining factor for if an entity can successfully weather the storms of change.

The implication for recruiters, in terms of culture, is ensuring that the executive leadership – in conjunction with HR – has thought deeply about the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shapes how placements are made within your recruiting agency. What are some ‘universal’ cultural values that your firm places a great deal of faith in? What types of qualities do you want your recruiters to look for as they place people? More specifically, GHCT encourages the following:

  • Prioritizing culture by CEO’s: Executives must clearly understand their company’s cultural values, determine how they connect to business strategy, and take responsibility for shaping them. Also, executives should routinely take their own inventory and analyze whether their own behaviors reinforce the desired culture.
  • Understanding both the current and desired culture: critical for leaders to examine current business practices to see how, and if, they align properly with desired culture. If there are practices that are counter-productive they should be thrown out and new ones implemented that edify the desired culture.
  • Measuring culture: Use empirical tools to understand employee attitudes and actions. HR should take the lead in this effort and get the results back to leaders for assessment (in a timely manner).

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Engagement – Always On

And finally, yet another trend identified in this study was employee engagement (which is closely tied to culture). Engagement is, “how people feel about the way things work around here.” The researchers also note that engagement is, “…a strong focus on listening to employees, workforce health and well-being, job redesign, and an enterprise-wide analysis of all dimensions of employee engagement.” Most companies still only evaluate engagement on an annual basis (64%), but in order to be truly effective managers and leaders should, “be proactive, implement the right tools, and give business leaders a continuous stream of data … and promote a culture of listening, and ensure that reward systems are consistent with engagement and retention goals.” True engagement means being ‘always on’ and continuously listening for what employees want and need from their jobs.

Engagement is also crucial because millennials are less loyal to organizations than ever before. Additionally, companies are tasked with a continued need to attract workers with technological and other specialized skills (as all companies digitize their businesses). And, finally, an organization’s employment brand is now open and transparent, so job candidates can easily see if a company is a great place to work (think of all of the “Best Place to Work” lists that are routinely populated on social media channels).

For professional recruiters the trend toward engagement can be meaningful in at least a couple of different ways. One, engaging all recruiters/hiring managers in effective ways can improve the culture/engagement/loyalty of team members. And, two, understanding the employee engagement of your customers (i.e., companies you are working to place candidates with) can aid in having successful placements where the candidate and the customer are both satisfied with the ‘marriage’. The researchers conclude:

  • inspirational201631Redefining engagement: By moving past the notion of turning your organization into a great place to work; also means “reaching down to the team and individual levels to foster highly engaged teams of employees doing work they love to do”.
  • Creating a sense of passion, purpose, and mission: Providing free perks can be nice, but companies that succeed in having highly engaged employees focus on driving meaning, purpose, and passion among their workers.
  • Linking compensation to engagement: Managers must get on board with tying team leaders’ compensation to their team members’ engagement. This sends a powerful signal and drives a sense of accountability about engagement efforts.
  • Doing “stay” interviews: In addition to having ‘exit’ interviews to find out why employees are leaving, also use ‘stay’ interviews to learn what it would take for an employee to stay at a company.

This article has outlined 3 of the 10 trends that the Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report covers. More highlights to come regarding HR trends that will no doubt have long-lasting impacts on professional recruiters. Suffice to say, the landscape of work is changing rapidly and it is critical that professional recruiters are aware of the trends and adapt their businesses accordingly.

For more information on this study check out the Full Report.


Source: Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters – Crelate

High School Graduates Should Embrace Flexibility & Recruiters as They Enter College

Take Heed Millennials it Could be a Bumpy (But Exciting) Ride

It’s summer and, therefore, about 3 million students in America have graduated high school and are making plans for what to do next with their lives. In my family I have a niece that has graduated and so I’ve been giving some thought to the question (if she were to ask me): “Uncle Jason what advice do you have for me as I embark on my next adventures post-High School?”

I have posed this as a hypothetical question given that millennials often come across as having all the answers and so never give even a fleeting thought to ask an elder for advice or counsel about their futures. This thought-process has been going on for many decades, just par for the course.

Looking back I probably had the ‘know it all’ mindset as well. I wish I would have been a little more open to advice from older and wiser folks, things might have went more smoothly for me professionally. I would advise, therefore, to accept guidance from credible people that care about you—you’ll likely be glad you did.

Where does my credibility come from you ask? I am a Gen X guy who believed (almost with a religious zeal) that education was important and the more you had the better off you would be professionally. So, from 1993 until 2010 I embarked on an educational quest to attain a Doctorate in Sociology so I could teach and do research (read: save the world). Boy did I have “Big” plans.

Along the way I earned a B.A., with cum laude honors (Missouri State University), an M.A. with honors (University of Kansas), and a Ph.D. (University of Kansas). Little did I know (or care to pay attention to) the major structural changes occurring in higher education (over the past couple of decades) when I was in the midst of my educational marathon. Namely, one critical trend has been colleges and universities shifting from full-time tenure track to part-time contingent faculty teaching opportunities as a cost-saving measure. The pay and benefits for PT faculty is considerably lower than for FT faculty–and obviously this has had a major impact on recently minted Ph.D’s.

In 1969, 22% of the faculty were non-tenure track and 78% were tenure-track positions. Today, those numbers have flipped–33.5% of positions are tenure-track and 66.5% are non-tenure track/ineligible for tenure. Of course higher education is just one of many professions that has seen considerable change over the past several decades, but as a student it would have been smart for me to research the field more to know exactly what I was getting in to.

It is against this backdrop that I decided to make a major career change at 38 years of age. This certainly wasn’t what I planned when I was in my 20’s. Therefore, I think these life experiences qualify me to say a few words on the topic. Also, for more than a decade I was employed at three or four institutions of higher learning… so I’m keenly aware of some of the potential pitfalls of higher education.

So, even though no one I know that has graduated in 2016 has asked, I’m still going to take this opportunity to provide young people some advice that I think they should hear. Words to the wise I wish someone would have told me when I was 18 and heading off to college at Missouri State University in Springfield, Missouri.

Perhaps the easiest way to organize my thoughts is around a series of “Lies, Damned lies, and Statistics” (thanks Mark Twain) that we routinely tell our young people as they are growing up that can have negative consequences. At the end I will also pose a to-do-list of how to avoid the pitfalls that trap so many of us. As will be shown, having a recruiter on your side could serve as a real life-saver.

The truth is that millennials have been lied to in a myriad of ways so let me be your “friend at the factory” as Dr. Phil says.

The Lies

“You can be whatever you want when you grow up”

This is a classic lie that when I was growing up in the 1970’s/80’s was told over and over again ad nauseam. From the get go this doesn’t even make logical sense—even though I know it sounds great when saying it to our kids. The primary problem with this line of bull is there clearly aren’t enough “good jobs” to go around and so someone has to do the less desirable jobs (of which there are plenty).

Furthermore, it’s just a fact that some people aren’t cut out for (or have the ability to do) “the most desirable” “highest paying jobs.” You have to work with the hand you are dealt.  Some of us get a pair of Aces but most of us get a 4 and 8 off suit.

What’s more, there are approximately 12 million people who work full-time in the U.S. and the reality is an overwhelming majority (easily 3 out of 4) do not like their jobs. Several studies have indicated upwards of 70% “Hate” their jobs.

According to a recent article on salary.com, in 2015, 42% of people indicated that if they somehow became instant millionaires they’d be at the office the next day. I must call BS on this as well, and say that number is likely closer to 10%. Also noteworthy was 73% of respondents in the salary.com survey said they work “primarily for a paycheck”. This clearly supersedes all of the other ‘pie in the sky’ reasons we like to think people work: to be fulfilled, to give back to the community, to feel like I make a difference and so on.

What would be more appropriate would be to say, “Work like hell to attain highly sought after skills, abilities, and aptitudes and then be cautiously optimistic that you will reach your goals and dreams.” In other words, have a few ‘fallback’s’ ready to go in-case things beyond your control happen (and they do ALL of the time). This is also a great opportunity to seek out a professional recruiter so they can help you figure out the best career path for you.

“It’s more important to love what you do than worry about how much money you will make”

This one is a real heart-breaker for me because, as a sociologist, I told myself this lie a LOT over the years as I plowed along getting paid next to nothing to educate our youth. It’s ridiculous. If you don’t make a decent enough wage to meet your basic needs AND then have a little left over for fun and to save for the future you WILL be miserable, period. I will concur that money doesn’t = happiness. However, in order to do 90% of what you want to do in American society, it takes money. Plenty of people in America (believe me) don’t LOVE their jobs but LOVE cashing those checks if they are lucky enough to make a high salary.

“Your professional success directly correlates to how hard you work”

In other words, the harder you work the more likely your chances at professional success (and the less you work… yada yada). Oh my I could write a whole book on this lie (and maybe someday I will) – but suffice to say this part of the “American Dream” is completely dead for many people. There are millions in our country that work their asses off and get paid barely enough to survive and have a decent standard of living (and most of us are forced to work 2-3 jobs just to keep our heads above water). Since the early 1970’s the data clearly show that a gigantic majority of Americans are working harder (many more hours and increasing their productivity) for less and less pay. Millennials: be prepared to work your ass off and it *may* not translate into professional success. Sorry, that is the truth.

The Damned Lies

“Don’t worry about your Student Loan debt because once you graduate you will ‘magically’ have an amazing job that will pay you plenty to pay off those ‘pesky’ loans in no time”

This is truly a damnable lie if I ever heard one. There are many lies rolled into this one, so a little difficult to unravel. For one thing, given how expensive college has become there are a miniscule number of jobs (right out of college) that pay enough to allow a recent graduate to comfortably make their payments on the $40k or more (on average) they owe in student loans. A study in 2012 showed that in the past three decades the cost of a college degree has increased by a whopping 1,120%.  So, the cost of a college education has skyrocketed to the moon and 51% of all American workers make less than $30,000/year. What could go wrong here?

Furthermore, it’s astonishing to learn about America’s student loan debt, namely how completely out of control it is. My prediction is Student Loans are the next ‘housing bubble’. Estimates are that over $1.35 trillion is owed by current and former students and rising every day. Let me write out that number so you can let it sink in properly: $1,350,000,000,000. In by-gone eras where tuition was reasonable and wages steadily went up for *everyone* student loans were not a problem. This game has totally changed and young people need to go into college knowing the risks and potential rewards.

“The degree or degrees you earn from America’s ‘esteemed’ institutions of higher learning will virtually ‘guarantee’ you a ticket into the ‘Middle Class’” 

This one has been dead and buried for several decades now, but somehow often we still believe it (I think because we REALLY want it to be true). The facts show that much of the 2008 post-recession job growth has been in low-wage jobs. For those that choose a major where those skills, abilities, and aptitudes are in high demand – there’s a *chance* you can make it into the middle class, but there are NO guarantees.

“Colleges and Universities will provide you with excellent career counseling upon your graduation” 

Absolutely not. The hubris of our institutions of higher learning is such that most are still stuck believing in the stale notion that “You’ll have no problem getting a job because you graduated from our prestigious university” – News flash no one cares anymore about institutional hubris and reputation. Most employers could care less, believe me. You MUST go out and actively promote yourself and get on the networking train (early in the process). While you are deciding what to major in, you might also want to explore recruiting firms and start fostering relationships with these critical folks as soon as possible.

The Statistics

I could provide a treasure chest of anecdotes on how statistics lie like a sidewalk, but for brevity I’ll just point out one that routinely bothers me.

“Even though college costs are completely out of control, college is still worth it” 

The article will inevitably go on and on providing some BS statistics about how ‘in general’ it’s still a good idea. Tell that to the person who has an over-priced degree or degrees and can’t land a decent job to save his/her life. Believe me, they could care less about some dumb ‘longitudinal study’ showing how great college is—no matter what the costs and sacrifices are.

Just because some statistic says that those with an A.A. or B.A. make ‘slightly more’ over their lifetimes than someone without those degrees should NOT make the scam of college magically “worth it.”

What Should you Do?

So, hopefully you haven’t jumped off a cliff at this point and become too depressed. I’ve tried to present the state of affairs in a truthful fashion (based on personal experience and data when it’s available) so you know the rules of the game and what to expect. Now let me put some ‘verbs in my sentences’ and provide a tangible ‘to-do-list’ of things that I wish I had done. Take these seriously and you have a chance to be much happier than the 7 out of 10 people who dislike their jobs.

  • Contact several recruiting firms in your area and try to find a potential match early in your schooling. Do NOT rely on your college/university to provide any assistance in this critical process. Professional recruiters have grown by leaps and bounds over the past couple of decades and can be an absolute life-saver for those trying to navigate the tricky labor market waters.
  • Manage your expectations! Don’t believe the hype about how great your professional life is going to be – understand the realities of the U.S. economy in 2016 and that there are only so many things YOU can control.
  • Work very hard. Be ready to consistently put in maximum effort in the classroom and in your professional pursuits.
  • Do not wrap your ‘happiness’ in what you do for a living. This is so much easier said than done (honestly I still struggle mightily with this one). Seek professional help if you can’t disavow yourself from this notion.
  • While in college explore what types of avocations and other activities you would like to contribute to your community that are NOT work related. It is likely that these pursuits will be where you truly find happiness and fulfillment. In my case I’ve chosen to be a football and basketball official—incredibly rewarding.
  • Base your choice of major/minor not ONLY on what you are passionate about but also where there is the most demand. As much time as you study the things assigned to you by your generally out of touch professors spend a sizable amount of time also studying what the hot jobs are and how you plan to get one of those jobs.
  • Put ‘networking’ as one of your goals/skills as you work toward your degree(s). Be sure you have a LinkedIn profile and be extremely careful about what kinds of ‘social media’ you share with your potential employers.
  • Do a Return on Investment (ROI) analysis in regard to how much risk (student loan debt) you are willing to take on given the salary you *may* earn post-graduation. Be willing to go to a less expensive school (and be proud as hell to do so) knowing that you are making a much sounder financial decision than your peers who are overpaying at vastly overrated schools (that likely have an unhealthy opinion of themselves).
  • When you work during your college years (whether in the summer or during the regular school year) open up an IRA savings account with a trusted financial adviser. I don’t care if you can only afford to contribute $10/month, do it. This will help you learn the power of investing smartly and why it’s so important to save as much money as you can. You will be amazed at how your money can grow—if you have 30+ years to let it grow (and you do).
  • The Economy/Market are fluid and apt to abrupt change (in the supply and demand of labor) – so be ready to be flexible and nimble as you navigate your professional trajectory. Totally disregard the notion that you will spend your entire career at one or two entities. The reality is you will likely be on the move much more frequently.
  • Enjoy your college experience! If you only view it as a ‘means to an end’ for a high paying job you will truly miss out on many of the wonderful aspects of college that have nothing to do with materialism or financial gain. One of my fondest memories of college was being part of (and President my Junior year) of a Co-Ed Service Fraternity (Alpha Phi Omega) at Missouri State (Beta Mu Chapter). It was with this group that I learned the power and satisfaction of doing for others in one’s local community. I still try and carry out this mission at 40. The seed was planted when I was 18.

Conclusion

Congratulations to all 3+ million millennials who graduated in the spring. You should feel proud of your accomplishments and look forward to having a successful professional career. However, it’s crucial to know the game you are getting into and work hard at adapting to changes in the economy and the labor market. The ‘old’ rules just don’t work like they used to. As long as you go in with your eyes wide open you will have a much better chance of navigating successfully around the potholes that are inevitably in your paths.

Featured Service: Student Loan Hero


Source: High School Graduates Should Embrace Flexibility & Recruiters as They Enter College – Crelate